Dakota Access Pipeline is up and running despite outrage


The oil pipeline construction that sparked nationwide protests is now complete, and the pipeline is in service.

Energy Transfer Partners announced Thursday the 1,172 mile Dakota Access Pipeline is now transporting crude oil from North Dakota to southern Illinois.

The pipeline crosses a number of bodies of water, including the Missouri River, which is the main drinking water source for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Demonstrators lived in a camp outside the pipeline's construction site for months before the state ordered the camp be vacated in February.

SEE MORE: Trump Signs Actions To Push Along Keystone XL, Dakota Access Pipelines

RELATED: Celebrities hold protest for the North Dakota pipeline

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Celebrities hold protest for the North Dakota pipeline
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Celebrities hold protest for the North Dakota pipeline
Actor Shailene Woodley stands with Native Americans on stage during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Actor Susan Sarandon (R) smiles during an interview with author Greg Palast (C) and Mark Ruffalo (L) backstage at a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Shailene Woodley closes her eyes as rain falls during a prayer circle at a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actors Frances Fisher, (L), Jaden Smith, and Kendrick Sampson (R) raise their hands into the air as they stand with an attendee during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actors Susan Sarandon, Mark Ruffalo, director Josh Fox, Frances Fisher and author Greg Palast pose for a photograph backstage during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
A woman stands with "No Ometeotl DAPL" drawn on her face during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Lehi Thundervoice Eagle Sanchez looks up during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Susan Sarandon stands backstage at a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Mark Ruffalo speaks during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Attendees stand together during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Shailene Woodley holds hands as rain falls during a prayer circle at a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Shailene Woodley hugs a woman wearing a #NoDAPL shirt on stage during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Joann Mae Spotted Bear speaks on stage with actor Frances Fisher during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
An attendee carries a flag in support of Native Americans during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
People attend a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Mark Ruffalo (L) speaks backstage with Nalleli Cobo, 15, during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Ed Begley Jr. attends a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actor Frances Fisher speaks on stage during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Actors Frances Fisher and Kendrick Sampson hug during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Attendees raise their fists into the air during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, California October 23, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
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The Standing Rock Tribe has pursued legal action in federal court to shut down the pipeline.

Standing Rock Tribe chairman Dave Archambault II said in a statement Thursday, "We will continue to battle the operation of this pipeline in court and remind everyone that just because the oil is flowing now doesn't mean that it can't be stopped."

The pipeline has leaked at least three times since March. The tribe alleges Energy Transfer Partners doesn't have a plan to "contain and clean a serious spill."

Combined with the Energy Transfer Crude Oil Pipeline, the Dakota Access Pipeline is expected to transport 520,000 barrels per day.


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