A water slide’s grand opening went sideways when a kid flew onto concrete and skidded to a stop

Meanwhile in Dublin, California, a multi-million dollar waterpark has closed a ride almost immediately after opening it.

RELATED: Get the Slip N' Slide do's and don'ts as you watch these folks fail in monumental fashion

An incident occurred at the "The Wave" waterpark, a $43 million facility, on its grand opening Saturday, and it was all caught on video.

A 10-year-old boy who was enjoying his first experience of the "Emerald Plunge" waterslide can be seen flying off of the slide and onto concrete before skidding to a stop.

According to the East Bay Times, the boy was able to walk it off and only suffered scratches. From the looks of the video, the boy wasn't doing anything reckless on the slide, which, by the way, had only been open for an hour and a half.

The park shut down the slide immediately and indefinitely. It is said that the park is "reevaluating that slide" and that it won't reopen until they find out what caused the nasty spill.

RELATED: A Kansas City water park just made this huge announcement about the slide that decapitated a 10-year-old boy

The slide drops at an 80-degree angle, a decline that is described on the park website as "severe."

The park maintained that the slide riders are supposed to cross their arms and legs, and the boy's legs, in this case, were apart.

Looking at the video, though, it's hard to say the boy did anything out of the ordinary, even if his legs weren't perfectly crossed.

Regardless, parents should be alert when it comes to these summer attractions. Last year, a boy was decapitated on a water slide in Kansas City.

15 PHOTOS
Caleb Schwab and Schlitterbahn Waterpark case
See Gallery
Caleb Schwab and Schlitterbahn Waterpark case

A general view of the Verruckt waterslide at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kansas July 8, 2014, before its scheduled opening on July 10.

(REUTERS/Dave Kaup/File Photo)

BREAKING: A settlement has been reached between the family of Caleb Schwab, the boy killed while riding Verruckt, a… https://t.co/JW7aR3Kpab

An empty raft is raised to the top for another load of riders during the public opening of the Verruckt waterslide at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kansas July 10, 2014. The slide, at 168 feet 7 inches, is the world?s tallest waterslide according to the Guinness World Records. It has had its opening postponed three times.

(REUTERS/Dave Kaup)

Riders slide down Verruckt, the world's tallest water slide, at the Schlitterbahn Kansas City Waterpark on Wednesday, July 9, 2014 in Kansas City, Kan.

(John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

Family and friends of Caleb Schwab leave Life Mission Church on Friday Aug. 12, 2016, following the funeral in Olathe, Kan. Caleb Schwab died Aug. 7th on the Verruckt water slide at the Schlitterbahn Water Park in Kansas City, Kan.

(John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

People stream into the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kan., on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016, as it re-opens three days after a 10-year-old boy died on the park's most noted attraction, the 17-story Verruckt slide.

(Keith Myers/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

Riders make their way up the hump after coming down Verruckt, the world's tallest water slide, at the Schlitterbahn Kansas City Waterpark on Wednesday, July 9, 2014 in Kansas City, Kan.

(John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

Riders take the plunge as an empty raft is lifted back to the top during the public opening of the Verruckt water slide at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kansas July 10, 2014. The slide, at 168 feet 7 inches, is the world?s tallest waterslide according to the Guinness World Records. It has had its opening postponed three times.

(REUTERS/Dave Kaup)

Workers scrub the Varruckt waterslide on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016, at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kan.

(Keith Myers/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

A worker takes down netting from the Varruckt waterslide on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kan.

(Keith Myers/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

Caleb Schwab died on the Verruckt water slide at the Schlitterbahn water park in Kansas City, Kan., in August 2016. Owners say the slide will be demolished after the investigation into the death of the 10-year-old is complete.

(Keith Myers/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

People watch as riders approach the second stage of the Verruckt waterslide during its public opening at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kansas July 10, 2014. The slide, at 168 feet 7 inches, is the world?s tallest waterslide according to the Guinness World Records. It has had its opening postponed three times.

(REUTERS/Dave Kaup)

Lifeguards prepare to unload riders during the public opening of the Verruckt waterslide at the Schlitterbahn Waterpark in Kansas City, Kansas July 10, 2014. The slide, at 168 feet 7 inches, is the world?s tallest waterslide according to the Guinness World Records. It has had its opening postponed three times.

(REUTERS/Dave Kaup)

The family of Caleb Schwab leave Life Mission Church on Friday Aug. 12, 2016, following the funeral in Olathe, Kan. Caleb Schwab died Aug. 7th on the Verruckt water slide at the Schlitterbahn Water Park in Kansas City, Kan.

(John Sleezer/Kansas City Star/TNS via Getty Images)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Just weeks ago, it was determined that the Schwab family would receive $19,732,125 in settlement money for their son's death.

It is believed that the raft Caleb was riding in with two adult women went airborne and came into contact with safety netting, resulting in the decapitation of the boy.

The Verrückt water slide at Schlitterban that Caleb Schwab died on is 17 stories tall, 14 stories taller than the "Emerald Plunge."

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.