Forget Buckingham Palace -- the graveyard is where London tourists are heading

For most travelers, heading to London or D.C. means taking a walk over the London Bridge or a selfie in front of the White House.

For other grim seeking tourists, they're adventures lead them straight to the nearest cemetery.

It's called tombstone tourism and it's gaining traction in major cities.

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London's Cemetery Club
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London's Cemetery Club
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE An unmarked grave with a headstone that resembles a computer screen, nicknamed 'iGrave' by the Cemetery Club, is seen in Kensal Green cemetery, north-west London, on December 9, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The coffins of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton and his wife Isabel Burton are seen inside the Burton Mausoleum at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE Tour guide Sheldon Goodman speaks to visitors at Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE An unmarked grave with a headstone that resembles a computer screen, nicknamed 'iGrave' by the Cemetery Club, is seen in Kensal Green cemetery, north-west London, on December 9, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE Crescent moon and start details are seen on the Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE An unmarked grave with a headstone that resembles a computer screen, nicknamed 'iGrave' by the Cemetery Club, is seen in Kensal Green cemetery, north-west London, on December 9, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent is seen at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent is seen at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE Tour guide Sheldon Goodman walks through Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE A general view shows gravestones in Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The Victorian mausoleum (C) of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent is seen at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent is seen at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE The Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent is seen at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE A picture shows the plaque on the front of the Victorian mausoleum of British adventurer and historian Richard Francis Burton taking the form of a Bedouin tent at the cemetery outside St Mary Magdalen Roman Catholic Church in Mortlake, southwest London, on December 4, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. The Burton Mausoleum was designed by Isabel Burton as a monument and final resting place for her husband (d1890) and herself (d1896). It takes the form of a Bedouin tent and has a window at the back from where a visitor can view the interior which is decorated with grave goods and bears two coffins and an altar. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL / AFP / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE Tour guide Sheldon Goodman walks through Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE Tour guide Sheldon Goodman speaks to visitors at Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY EDOUARD GUIHAIRE A general view shows gravestones in Tower Hamlets cemetery in east London on October 31, 2015. Some prefer to spend their leisure time immersed in music or on the sports field, but for a small group of tombstone tourists, Britain's graveyards are their playground. The 'Cemetery Club' shares its appreciation of 'these often overlooked and misunderstood places' every Monday on a blog, which is followed by a band of 'taphophiles' -- the name given to cemetery enthusiasts. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL / AFP / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
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Cemeteries aren't just a place to mourn anymore, according to the Cemetery Club. This London based tour told Lonely Planet that cemeteries are a library of the long gone who have stories and achievements which should be shared.

One stop on this tour will have you at Tower Hamlets where residents of London's notorious East End are buried.

Here in the U.S., D.C.'s congressional cemetery offers up walking tours.

The legendary illusionist Harry Houdini is buried in Queens, NY which is a popular destination on Halloween.

The Cemetery Club in London said "there is a romance associated with graveyards. You get history, nature and beauty."

Talk about a grim way to travel!

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