The haunting images that Diane Arbus captured while roaming the parks of NYC

9 PHOTOS
New York parkgoers in the 1960s and '70s
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New York parkgoers in the 1960s and '70s
Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Three boys at a baseball game in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Two ladies walking in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1963"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Woman with a locket in Washington Square Park, N.Y.C. 1965"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Two friends in the park, N.Y.C. 1965"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Girl and boy, Washington Square Park, N.Y.C. 1965"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"Jorge Luis Borges in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1969"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

"A young man and his girlfriend with hot dogs in the park, N.Y.C. 1971"

Image: © The Estate of Diane Arbus

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Diane Arbus received her first camera as a honeymoon gift from her husband, with whom she ran a successful fashion photography business for almost a decade.

In 1956, restless and unfulfilled, she fled the confines of the commercial studio and took to the streets, first with a 35mm Nikon and later with a medium format twin-lens reflex camera.

Some of the richest grounds for photographic encounters were the city's public parks, where Arbus prowled the lanes and lawns with her camera and flash, hunting for the strange, melancholy, and striking subjects that would come to define her style.

The images Arbus made in Central Park and Washington Square are the subject of a new show, Diane Arbus: In the Park, on view at the Lévy Gorvy gallery in New York through June 24.

The exhibit features photos from throughout Arbus' brief but storied 15-year career, including some of her most famous images, such as Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962, as well as many others that have never before been displayed.

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