Chicago woman auctioning off moon dust from apollo 11 mission for $4 million

CHICAGO, IL (WGN) -- It was one of the biggest moments in history; the Apollo 11 mission of 1969 brought man to the moon. There were also a few things that came back with the astronauts.

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28 weird names we have for different full moons


According to a statement from NASA, the next time super moon will be this close will be on 25 November 2034. (Photo by Soner Kilinc/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

November: Beaver Moon, Frost Moon

(Photo by Rainer Erl/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

December: Cold Moon, Long Night's Moon

(Photo via REUTERS/Ognen Teofilvovski)

January: Wolf Moon, Old Moon

(Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

February: Snow Moon, Hunger Moon

(Photo credit ARMIN WEIGEL/AFP/Getty Images)

March: Worm Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon

Photo Credit: Getty 

April: Pink Moon, Grass Moon, Fish Moon

Photo Credit: Karihak/flickr

May: Flower Moon, Planting Moon

Photo Credit: Marcus Ward/Flickr 

June: Strawberry Moon, Rose Moon

(Photo by John McDonnell / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

July: Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Hay Moon

Photo Credit: Miwok/Flickr

August: Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon

(Photo by Pradita Utana/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

September: Harvest Moon, Corn Moon

REUTERS/Mike Blake 

October: Hunter's Moon

(Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

Bonus: A 'blue moon' happens when the moon rises in its full stage twice during the same month.

REUTERS/Darren Staples 


While there, Neil Armstrong collected some moon dust and placed it in a bag. Turns out NASA forgot about the bag over time and accidentally auctioned it off with other space related objects for a little less than a thousand dollars.

Nancy Lee Carlson, a Chicago-area attorney, bought the bag at an auction. She was certain there was real moon dust inside, so after she bought it for just over $900, she sent it back to NASA for testing.

NASA confirmed it was real moon dust and refused to give it back, saying they made a mistake.

Carlson went to court over the matter and won. And now she is auctioning off the moon dust, where it's expected to bring in about $4 million.

Carlson says she'll donate some of the money to scientific research.

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