The Red Sea's coral reef may hold the key to fighting global warming

The Red Sea's coral reef may be able to beat climate change. Swiss and Israeli scientists have discovered that as temperatures rise, this special type of coral grows stronger.

This discovery could come in handy. Warming oceans destroy other reefs around the world. Scientists hope this coral can be used to reseed dying reefs.

RELATED: Marine life in coral reefs

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Marine life in coral reefs

A giant green turtle rests on a coral reef at a diving site near the island of Sipadan in Celebes Sea east of Borneo November 7, 2005.

(Peter Andrews / Reuters)

Golden butterflyfish (Chaetodon semilarvatus) swimming over coral reef with a large school of pygmy sweepers (Parapriacanthus guentheri) and soft corals (Dendronephthya sp.). Egypt, Red Sea.

(Georgette Douwma via Getty Images)

Pterois is a genus of venomous marine fish, commonly known as lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific. Pterois, also called zebrafish, firefish, turkeyfish or butterfly-cod, is characterized by conspicuous warning coloration with red, white, creamy, or black bands, showy pectoral fins, and venomous spiky fin rays.

(Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images)

A pair of golden butterflyfish (Chaetodon semilarvatus), a pair of threadfin butterflyfish (Chaetodon auriga) and goldies or lyretail anthias (Pseudanthias squamipinnis). Egypt, Red Sea.

(Georgette Douwma via Getty Images_

School of Maldives

(Photo by: Camesasca Davide/AGF/UIG via Getty Images)

The foxface rabbitfish (Siganus vulpinus) is a popular saltwater aquarium fish. It belongs to the rabbitfish family (Siganidae) and is sometimes still placed in the obsolete genus Lo.

(Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Details of fauna in the Coral Reef seen in Ripley's Aquarium. Coral reefs are underwater structures made from calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of tiny animals found in marine waters that contain few nutrients.

(Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Snapper and Sweetlips in Coral Reef, North Male Atoll, Maldives

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Clownfish in Bali, Indonesia

(Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Yellow-ribbon Sweetlips between Soft Corals, Plectorhinchus polytaenia, Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Emperor Angelfish, Pomacanthus imperator, Himendhoo Thila, North Ari Atoll, Maldives

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Shoal of Humpback Snapper, Lutjanus gibbus, Cocoa Corner, South Male Atoll, Maldives

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Coralfishes on Coral Reef, North Ari Atoll, Maldives

(Photo by Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Powder-blue surgeonfish (Acanthurus leucosternon) and Lyretail anthias (Pseudanthias squamipinnis) swimming past soft corals (Dendronephthya sp). Egypt, Red Sea.

(Georgette Douwma via Getty Images)

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