T-Rex pulverized bones with 8,000 pounds of force, study says

Like we needed another reason to find the Tyrannosaurus rex terrifying!

Well, professor of Biological Science at Florida State University, Gregory Erickson, just gave us one.

In a study published Wednesday in Scientific Reports, Erickson and Paul Gignac, assistant professor of Anatomy and Vertebrate Paleontology at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences, explain that the dinosaur could actually pulverize bones.

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Largest Dinosaur print found
People stand next to a footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 20, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia measures the footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting with a tour guide the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia touches a dinosaur's footprint at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 20, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
A man walks next to dinosaur footprints at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Visitors look at dinosaur footprints while visiting the Cal Orcko cliff in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
Children play with the replica of a dinosaur fossil at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A child walks up a playground climber with dinosaur footprints at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A mother takes a photograph of her children while they pose in front of the replica of a Tyrannosaurus rex at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Children have a snack while sitting next to the replica of a Tyrannosaurus rex at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
The replica of a Titanosaur is seen at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Visitors walk underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
A visitor walks underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
The replica of a Titanosaur is seen at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Visitors walk underneath a replica of a Titanosaur at the Cretaceous park in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado 
Paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia measures the footprint made by a meat-eating predator some 80 million years ago and one of the largest of its kind ever found, at the Maragua Syncline, Bolivia, July 21, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
A truck unloads rocks next to the Cal Orko cliff where thousands of dinosaur's footprints can be seen, in Cal Orcko, on the outskirts of Sucre, Bolivia, July 22, 2016. REUTERS/David Mercado
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He worked on a new study that found T-Rex had a bite force equal to the weight of three small cars. That's nearly 8,000 pounds of force.

To put that into perspective, that's more than twice the bite force of the largest living crocodiles.

Today, this ability to pulverize bone is really only seen in animals such as wolves and hyenas. The T-rex's capacity to do this makes it very unique among reptiles.

This ability allowed the dinosaur to drive open cracks during eating that would produce high-pressure fracture arcades and ultimately result in the explosion of many bones.

SEE ALSO: New Mexico paleontologist uncovers new dinosaur species

"It was this bone-crunching acumen that helped T. rex to more fully exploit the carcasses of large horned-dinosaurs and duck-billed hadrosaurids whose bones, rich in mineral salts and marrow, were unavailable to smaller, less equipped carnivorous dinosaurs," Gignac said.

The study shows how sophisticated feeding abilities seen in modern mammals today were actually being utilized by reptiles during the age of the dinosaurs.

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