Lawsuit claims Baylor football used gang rape as a 'bonding experience'

A new Title IX lawsuit claims the Baylor University football team used gang rapes as a "bonding experience" for players.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court by an anonymous former Baylor volleyball player, accuses some four to eight Baylor football players of gang rape at a 2012 party. This allegation marks the seventh claim filed against Baylor regarding its football program -- an athletic team the suit says is marked by a "culture of sexual violence."

SEE ALSO: Bombshell lawsuit accuses Baylor football program of 52 'acts of rape' and of paying student's tuition in exchange for silence

The lawsuit's account of this plantiff's alleged rape reads as follows:

"During the party, Plaintiff's friend saw one football player trying to pull Plaintiff into a bathroom several times. Plaintiff recalls that another Baylor football player kept grabbing at her throughout the night and she repeatedly told him 'no.' The day before, Plaintiff had repeatedly declined the football player's requests to 'hook up' with him."

"At some point after Plaintiff's friends left the party, Plaintiff remembers one football player picking her up, putting her in his vehicle and taking her somewhere. It was there that at least four Baylor football players brutally gang raped Plaintiff. Plaintiff remembers lying on her back, unable to move and staring at glow-in-the-dark stars on the ceiling as the football players took turns raping her. Following the gang rape, Plaintiff remembers hearing the players yell 'Grab her phone! Delete my numbers and texts!'"

RELATED: Baylor regents say Art Briles failed to report sex assault allegations

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Baylor regents say Art Briles failed to report sex assault allegations
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Baylor regents say Art Briles failed to report sex assault allegations
Baylor University head coach Art Briles reacts against the University of Oklahoma in the first half of their NCAA Big 12 football game at Floyd Casey Stadium in Waco, Texas, United States on November 19, 2011.

(REUTERS/Mike Stone/File Photo)

Dec 29, 2015; Orlando, FL, USA; Baylor Bears senior Jay Lee (left) dunks Baylor Bears head coach Art Briles with Gatorade following the Russell Athletic Bowl college football game at Florida Citrus Bowl. Baylor won 49-38.  

(Reinhold Matay-USA TODAY Sports)

WACO, TX - DECEMBER 5: Head coach Art Briles talks to his players from the sideline against the Texas Longhorns at McLane Stadium on December 5, 2015 in Waco, Texas.

(Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)

MANHATTAN, KS - NOVEMBER 05: Head coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears looks on prior to a game against the Kansas State Wildcats on November 5, 2015 at Bill Snyder Family Stadium in Manhattan, Kansas.

(Photo by Peter G. Aiken/Getty Images)

WACO, TX - DECEMBER 5: Head coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears looks on from the sidelines against the Texas Longhorns at McLane Stadium on December 5, 2015 in Waco, Texas.

(Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)

ARLINGTON, TX - NOVEMBER 26: Coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears looks on during a game against the Texas Tech Raiders at Cowboys Stadium on November 26, 2011 in Arlington, Texas. The Baylor Bears defeated the Texas Tech Raiders 66-42.

(Photo by Sarah Glenn/Getty Images)

WACO, TX - OCTOBER 19: Head coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears looks on during warmups before kickoff against the Iowa State Cyclones on October 19, 2013 at Floyd Casey Stadium in Waco, Texas.

(Photo by Cooper Neill/Getty Images)

06 December 2014: Baylor Bears head coach Art Briles accepts the trophy from Big 12 Commissioner Bill Bowlsby for the Big 12 Co-Champion after the game between the Baylor Bears and the Kansas State Wildcats at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. Baylor beat Kansas State 38-27.

(Photo by Matthew Pearce/Icon Sportswire/Corbis via Getty Images)

BUFFALO, NY - SEPTEMBER 12: Head Coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears chats to players prior to kickoff against the Buffalo Bulls at UB Stadium on September 12, 2014 in Buffalo, New York.

(Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)

15 OCT 2016: Endzone pylon during the game between the Baylor Bears and the Kansas Jayhawks at McLane Stadium in Waco, Texas. Baylor beats Kansas 49-7. (Photo by Matthew Pearce/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
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The suit also details that Baylor coaching staff played a part in facilitating an environment where these sexual acts could take place, claiming Assistant Coach Kendall Briles once appealed to a high school recruit saying, "Do you like white women? Because we have a lot of them at Baylor and they LOVE football players."

"These girls affected by this are seeking their day in court," said plantiff lawyer Muhammad Aziz to the Waco Tribune. "We thought about this a lot, and me and my client thought about it and discussed it. Eventually, we decided to proceed. Really, what we are seeking to enforce is just a safe education environment for the girls at the school."

Baylor said to the Tribune it had been trying to reach a resolution with the alleged victim for "many months."

RELATED: American colleges with most rape reports

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Colleges with most rape reports
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Colleges with most rape reports

Brown University: 43 rape reports

Data as of 2014

University of Connecticut: 43 rape reports

Data as of 2014

Dartmouth College: 42 rape reports

Data as of 2014

Wesleyan University: 37 rape reports

Data as of 2014

University of Virginia: 35 rape reports

Data as of 2014

Harvard University: 33 rape reports

Data as of 2014

University of North Carolina at Charlotte: 32 rape reports

Data as of 2014

Rutgers-New Brunswick: 32 rape reports

Data as of 2014

University of Vermont: 27 rape reports

Data as of 2014

Stanford University: 26 rape reports

Data as of 2014

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