Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are throwing around the 'I' word amid the latest Trump-Comey bombshell

Reports that President Donald Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to end the bureau's investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn has left lawmakers on both sides of the aisle shell-shocked — and openly discussing the possibility of impeachment proceedings.

Democratic Rep. Al Green on Wednesday went to the House floor and called for Trump's impeachment.

Democratic Reps. John Yarmuth and Mark Pocan also tossed around the "I" word in interviews with local radio stations, saying Democrats are "actually pretty close to considering impeachment" and that Comey's firing moved Trump's "impeachment clock" an "hour closer."

RELATED: Possible replacements for FBI director James Comey

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Possible replacements for FBI director James Comey

Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe

REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Former Oklahoma Governor Frank Keating  

REUTERS/Adrees Latif AL

FBI Executive Assistant Director Richard McFeely

REUTERS/Yuri Gripas 

Former Congressman Mike Rogers (R-MI) 

Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX)

Photographer: F. Carter Smith/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe

 (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

FBI Criminal Cyber, Response ad Services Branch Executive Assistant Director Paul Abbate

Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Former NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly

REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Former Deputy Attorney General Larry Thompson

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers

Photo by Stacie Scott-Pool/Getty Images

Former Prosecutor Michael Garcia

Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Federal Judge Henry Hudson

Photo by Jay Paul for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Former head of the Transportation Security Administration John Pistole

Photo by Andrew Burton for Reuters 
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Democrats are not the only ones discussing the possibility. Republican Rep. Justin Amash told reporters on Wednesday that if the allegations contained in Comey's memo are true, then it would be "grounds for impeachment." He added that he trusts Comey more than he trusts the president, according to Hill reporter Katie Williams.

SEE ALSO: Poll: Majority oppose President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey

And Sen. Angus King, an independent who caucuses with Democrats and sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said he would "have to say yes" when a CNN host asked if Congress had moved closer to the impeachment process.

Axios reported Wednesday that "Republicans close to the White Housefear that Tuesday's revelations could take President Trump into a legal or constitutional realm where his staff and supporters can't save him." A Republican operative told the publication that "a whole new door has opened" that could move the administration "backwards," rather than simply "grinding it to a halt."

FILE PHOTO: A combination photo shows U.S. President Donald Trump (L) in the House of Representatives in Washington, U.S., on February 28, 2017 and FBI Director James Comey in Washington U.S. on July 7, 2016.   REUTERS/Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool, Gary Cameron/File PhotoThomson Reuters

At an award dinner on Tuesday night, Republican Sen. John McCain told reporter Bob Schieffer that the Trump scandals have reached a "Watergate-size and scale."

"I think we've seen this movie before. I think it appears at a point where it's of Watergate size and scale ... the shoes continue to drop, and every couple days there's a new aspect," McCain said.

The famously hawkish senator did not mention the word "impeachment." But he drew further comparisons to President Richard Nixon, telling Schieffer that he would advise Trump to do "the same thing" that Nixon was advised to do before he was faced with impeachment proceedings: "Get it all out."

SEE ALSO: House Oversight chair Jason Chaffetz on Comey's memos: 'I have my subpoena pen ready'

"It's not going to be over until every aspect of it is thoroughly examined and the American people make a judgment," McCain said. "And the longer you delay, the longer it's going to last."

Meanwhile, betting odds in the UK that Trump will not last four years in office have increased to a 55% probability, according to Katie Baylis, spokeswoman at the British betting firm Betfair.

"And punters think it won't be too long before he departs," Baylis added, "with the odds of him leaving this year now into 12/5 from 11/2 — a 27% chance [up] from 16% before the latest allegations."

'Drip, drip, drip'

Allan Lichtman, a political historian and American University professor political historian, said the case is "becoming too compelling for even Republicans to resist an impeachment inquiry," which they may be tempted to use "to get to the bottom of the many controversies swirling around this administration."

"Otherwise it's going to be drip, drip, drip, which is not good even for Republicans," Lichtman said.

Indeed, the latest Trump-Comey bombshell came 24 hours after the previous — that Trump had disclosed highly classified information to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during a meeting in the Oval Office last week.

RELATED: Looking back at the Watergate scandal

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Looking back at the Watergate scandal
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Looking back at the Watergate scandal
View of the Watergate Hotel in Washington on June 17, the 25th anniversary of the break-in at the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee.The ensuing Watergate scandal toppled Ricard M. Nixon from the presidency in 1972. WATERGATE
UNITED STATES - JUNE 17: AFTER BREAK IN-Police and telephone men check out the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington Saturday after five men were arrested during a break-in attempt. Authorities called it an elaborate plot to bug the office and said the men had photographic equipment and electronic listening devices. Watergate break-in. (Photo by Ken Feil/Washington Post/Getty Images)
A United States marshal escorts Frank Sturgis from a courthouse after his arraignment. He was involved in the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate complex. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
United States marshals escort James McCord and Eugenio Martinez from a courthouse after their arraignment. They were involved in the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate complex. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
A United States marshal escorts Eugenio Martinez from a courthouse after his arraignment. He was involved in the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate complex. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
A United States marshal escorts Bernard Barker from a courthouse after his arraignment. He was involved in the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate complex. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Marking the 30th anniversary of the break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate Office Building in Washington, 17 June 1972, the US National Archives opened up and displayed some of the police evidence 13 June 2002 that has been sealed in archival warehouses for almost 30 years. The personal phonebook belonging to burgular Bernard Barker containing the entry HH for Howard Hunt (top right), which established the direct connection to Hunt and the Nixon White House, is seen here. AFP Photo/Paul J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Marking the 30th anniversary of the break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate Office Building in Washington, 17 June 1972, the US National Archives opened up and displayed some of the police evidence 13 June 2002 that has been sealed in archival warehouses for almost 30 years. To the rear are arrest photo enlargements of the 4 Cubans from Miami, Valdez Martinez(L),Virgilio Gonzalez(2L), Bernard Barker, and Frank Sturgis(R) who committed the crime and in the forground are lights, film, a toolbag , a trenchcoat, and bugging equipment used in one of the most famous burglaries in political history. AFP Photo/Paul J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A witness indicates H.R. Haldeman, Nixon's chief of staff, on a diagram as he testifies before the Senate Watergate Committee during the Watergate Hearings. The nationally televised hearings began in mid-May 1973 and resulted in the resignation of President Richard Nixon on August 8, 1974. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) This sketch shows White House Watergate Attorney James St. Claire arguing before the Supreme Court over whether President Nixon could assert executive privilege in withholding evidence demanded by Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworksi in the Watergate cover-up trial. The Justices are (L to R), Chief Justice Warren Burger; William Brennan; Byron White; Henry Blackmun; and at right is the chair normally occupied by William Rehnquist, who withdrew from this case.
President Richard Nixon delivers one of his periodic Watergate speeches. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee Sam Ervin listens to a witness during the Watergate Hearings. The nationally televised hearings began in mid-May 1973 and resulted in the resignation of President Richard Nixon on August 8, 1974. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
The Senate Watergate Committee sits with key staff during the Watergate Hearings. The nationally televised hearings began in mid-May 1973 and resulted in the resignation of President Richard Nixon on August 8, 1974. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
U.S. President Richard Nixon during Press Conference Regarding Middle East Crisis and Watergate, 1973. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Birmingham Evening Mail Front Page Published Friday 27th April 1973. Headlines. Bugging : Nixon aide resigns. (Photo by Birmingham Post and Mail Archive/Mirrorpix/Mirrorpix via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) President Richard Nixon, claiming he was misled by his staff, has assumes 'full responsibility' for the Watergate bugging and indicated a special prosecutor may be named to investigate the worst crisis of his presidency. Six top administration officials have resigned as a consequence of the case. Attorney General Richard G.Kleindienst and top White House aides H.R.Haldeman, John D.Ehrlichman and John W.Dean III all resigned April 30. Last week, L.Patrick Gray III, acting director of the F.B.I., and Jeb Stuart Magruder, a former Haldeman aide, also resigned.
Chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee Sam Ervin sits with Chief Counsel Sam Dash, Senator Howard Baker, Staffer Rufus Edmiston and others as they listen to a witness during the Watergate Hearings. The nationally televised hearings began in mid-May 1973 and resulted in the resignation of President Richard Nixon on August 8, 1974. (Photo by � Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Atlanta: George Bush, national chairman of the Republican Party, called on the Watergate committee to quickly wrap up its hearings and 'end the speculation' as to whether President Nixon was involved in the bugging and coverup. Bush spoke at a noon news conference prior to addressing the National Young Republican Federation in convention in Atlanta.
(Original Caption) John Ehrlichman, former Presidential counsel, testifies before the Senate Watergate Committee. He said that President Nixon gave no hint on March 22 he knew about a Watergate coverup. Ehrlichman will continue his testimony before the committee July 30th.
A demonstration outside the Whitehouse in support of the impeachment of President Nixon (1913 - 1994) following the watergate revelations. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
Colour photograph of President Richard Nixon (1913-1994) 37th President of the United States. Dated 1974. (Photo by Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
8th August 1974: View of the cover of an Extra edition of the New York Post from the day US president Richard Nixon resigned, with the headline, 'NIXON QUITS TONIGHT'. (Photo by Blank Archives/Getty Images)
8th August 1974: American president Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) announces his resignation on national television, following the Watergate scandal. (Photo by Pierre Manevy/Express/Getty Images)
Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) gives the thumbs up after his resignation as 37th President of the United States. His son-in-law David Eisenhower is with him as he says goodbye to his staff at the White House, Washington DC. (Photo by Gene Forte/Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images)
The Watergate hotel and condominium complex pictured on the Potomac River in Washington, June 17, 2002. Thirty years ago, on June 17, 1972 a break-in into an office in Washington's elegant Watergate building ended more than two years later with the resignation of the 37th president, Richard Nixon. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang HK/ME
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It also came less than a week after the Trump administration wavered in its public statements about Comey's dismissal, with Trump telling NBC's Lester Holt that "the Russia thing" was on his mind when he fired Comey. That contradicted statements put out by his own aides days earlier, who claimed Trump had fired Comey on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard Law School specializing in constitutional studies, predicted that Republicans will first "gauge public reaction" to the Comey reports before launching impeachment proceedings.

"But we are gradually moving in that direction," Feldman said.

Louis Seidman, a professor of constitutional law at Georgetown University, said that "the right question is not legal; it is political: Has the President violated the oath he took to support and defend the Constitution of the United States? Lawyers and law professors have no special expertise about that. It's an issue for the American people to decide."

SEE ALSO: Putin sounds off on Trump-Russia meeting, 'political schizophrenia' of US

Seidman said he remained skeptical, however, that impeachment is a serious possibility.

"It seems to me quite unlikely (at least at this point) that Trump will face impeachment proceedings," he said. "Most Republicans seem to have cast their lot with President Trump."

Hugh Gusterson, an anthropologist at George Washington University, said in an email that "by coincidence, I spent most of" Tuesday "talking to various staffers and one senator on the Hill."

"No one raised the issue of impeachment. They all seemed to assume they would have to muddle on through the chaos. But everyone I spoke to was a Democrat and, when I asked them what Republicans were thinking, they didn't seem to know," Gusterson said. "On the other hand, reading conservative commentators in [Tuesday's] Washington Post, I thought I detected a shift in tone."

Paul RyanWin McNamee/Getty Images

Veteran political operatives David Axelrod and David Gergen, for their part, predicted that the Comey memo could spur House Republicans to seriously consider impeachment proceedings.

"I've been resistant to impeachment talk until now, but if Comey memo is true — and Comey is very credible — we are into a whole new deal here," Axelrod, a former adviser to President Barack Obama, tweeted on Tuesday night.

Gergen, a former presidential adviser to Presidents Ronald Reagan, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, and Bill Clinton, told CNN on Tuesday night that Trump is now "in impeachment territory."

"It looks like he was trying to impede the investigation," said Gergen. "He was using his power to do that, and when James Comey didn't go along with him, when he wasn't his boy, he fired him."

"After watching the Clinton impeachment I thought I'd never see another one," Gergen added. "But I think we're in impeachment territory now for the first time."

Seidman said it is worth emphasizing that "there are all sorts of considerations that members of the House might appropriately consider, but that would be improper for a judge or jury to take into account."

"For example," he continued, "what the effect would be of removing a president when something like a third of the country would believe that their election victory was stolen from them, how much risk there is that this president's poor judgment will lead to truly catastrophic consequences for the country, and whether the vice president would do a better job."

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, seemed to echo those concerns in an interview with CNN on Wednesday morning.

"There's no avoiding having to answer the question" of whether impeachment is a possibility, Schiff said. "But I do think that all of us ought to talk about just what a wrenching experience that would be for the country. It's not something that we should be rushing into, or rushing to suggest."

"We need to get to the bottom of what took place, and what the president's intention was in doing this," Schiff added. "Was he trying to shut down a legitimate prosecution? Was he doing it because he was worried that the trail might ultimately lead back to him? These are some profound questions I think we need to answer before we get too far down the path of, 'What are the consequences if the proof turns out to be there?'"

NOW WATCH: This is how impeachment works — and what a president would have to do to be impeached

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