Dylann Roof said white nationalists would save him from execution


Dylann Roof, the 23-year-old convicted of killing nine black parishioners in a South Carolina church in 2015, reportedly told a psychologist that his death penalty wouldn't happen. The reason: white nationalists would save him.

A November 2016 report written during the trial found that Roof reportedly told a psychologist that he'd be "rescued by white nationalists after they took over the government," according to CNN.

The report also found that Roof was diagnosed with autism and had experienced "psychiatric symptoms that are not explained by autism spectrum disorder, including anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, disordered thinking, and psychosis." His psychotic symptoms included delusions of grandeur and somatic delusions, or the false belief that something is terribly wrong with one's body.

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Dylann Roof, Charleston church shooter, trial and sentencing
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Dylann Roof, Charleston church shooter, trial and sentencing
Police lead suspected shooter Dylann Roof into the courthouse in Shelby, North Carolina, U.S. June 18, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Miczek/File Photo
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 19: (L-R) Sisters Margaret Kerry, Mary Thecla and Kathleen Lang of the Order of the Daughters of St. Paul pray outside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church June 19, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley called for the death penalty for Dylann Storm Roof, 21, of Lexington, South Carolina, if he is found guilty of murdering nine people during a prayer meeting at the church Wednesday night. Among the dead is the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor of the church which, according to the National Park Service, is the oldest black congregation in America south of Baltimore. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Crowds take part in the morning service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, June 21, 2015. The church reopened today for its first service since Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old with a criminal record, allegedly killed nine people at a Bible-study meeting in the historic African-American church in an attack U.S. officials are investigating as a hate crime. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Department of Homeland Security officers stand outside the Charleston Federal Courthouse during the federal trial of Dylann Roof who was found guilty of 33 counts including hate crimes in Charleston, South Carolina December 15, 2016. REUTERS/Randall Hill
John Pinckney (C) father of Emanuel Church shooting victim Rev. Clementa Pinckney, leaves the Charleston Federal Courthouse after Dylann Roof was found guilty on 33 counts including hate crimes in Charleston, South Carolina December 15, 2016. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Dylann Storm Roof appears by closed-circuit television at his bond hearing in Charleston, South Carolina June 19, 2015 in a still image from video. A 21-year-old white man has been charged with nine counts of murder in connection with an attack on a historic black South Carolina church, police said on Friday, and media reports said he had hoped to incite a race war in the United States. REUTERS/POOL
Family and friends of the Emanuel Church shooting victims, arrive at the Charleston Federal Courthouse during the federal trial of Dylann Roof in Charleston, South Carolina January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Randall Hill
CHARLESTON, SC - JULY 31: Attorney William Nettles, part of the defense team for Dylann Roof, arrives at federal court prior to the arraignment hearing for the Emanuel AME gunman JULY 31, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Roof, the shooter involved in the June 17 massacre at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston faces 33 federal charges, including hate crimes. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Mourner Rosie Frederick kneels outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015 a day after a mass shooting left nine dead during a bible study at the church. Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old white man, was arrested on Thursday on suspicion of having fatally shot nine people at the historic African-American church in South Carolina. The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Wednesday's attack as a hate crime, motivated by racism or other prejudice. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
CHARLESTON, SC - JULY 31: Jerome Smalls stands outside a federal court building JULY 31, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Earlier in the morning Dylann Roof, the shooter involved in the June massacre at Emanuel AME Church was arraigned on 33 federal charges, including federal hate crimes. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Charleston, SC - December 6, 2016: Mother Emanuel AME Church photographed Tuesday, Dec. 06, 2016 in Charleston. (Photo by Alex Holt for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Judge J.C. Nicholson makes a point during a hearing on a gag order in the pending trial of Dylann Roof, at the Judicial Center in Charleston, South Carolina July 16, 2015. The South Carolina Press Association is challenging a decision by Judge Nicholson made last week on potential trial participants as well as banning the release of documents in the case, including 911 police dispatch calls, coroner's reports and witness statements. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Photo shows the Charleston Federal Courthouse during the federal trial of Dylann Roof in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Randall Hill
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 18: U.S. President Barack Obama pauses during a statement regarding the shooting in Charleston, South Carolina, June 18, 2015 at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. Authorities have arrested 21-year-old Dylann Roof of Lexington County, South Carolina, as a suspect in last night's deadly shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine people. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Anthony Thompson, husband of Emanuel Church shooting victim Myra Thompson, leaves the courthouse during a break at the Charleston Federal Courthouse during the federal trial of Dylann Roof in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S. January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Randall Hill
A Department of Homeland Security officer prepares to stop traffic as security personnel transport Dylann Roof in a van after a jury sentenced him to death at the Charleston Federal Courthouse in Charleston, South Carolina January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Randall Hill
South Carolina shooting suspect Dylann Roof (R) is escorted by police after being detained in Shelby, North Carolina, June 18, in this still image from a dash cam video released by the Shelby Police Department June 23, 2015. Roof is accused of murdering nine people in a historic black South Carolina church in Charleston on June 17. REUTERS/Shelby Police Department/Handout THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
Dylann Roof is seen in this June 18, 2015 handout booking photo provided by Charleston County Sheriff's Office. REUTERS/Charleston County Sheriff's Office/Handout via Reuters FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
A sign of support is pictured at a makeshift memorial at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, June 20, 2015. Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old with a criminal record, is accused of killing nine people at a Bible-study meeting in the historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, in an attack U.S. officials are investigating as a hate crime. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Judge James Gosnell speaks during a bond hearing for Dylann Roof who appeared in a video feed from jail in North Charleston, S.C. June 19, 2015. Roof has been charged with nine counts of murder in connection with an attack on a historic black South Carolina church, police said on Friday, and media reports said he had hoped to incite a race war in the United States. Grace Beahm/The Post and Courier/Pool
Police lead suspected shooter Dylann Roof into the courthouse in Shelby, North Carolina, June 18, 2015. Roof, a 21-year-old with a criminal record, is accused of killing nine people at a Bible-study meeting in a historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, in an attack U.S. officials are investigating as a hate crime. REUTERS/Jason Miczek
John Strong (C), special agent in charge of the FBI in Charlotte, NC speaks to the media from the Shelby Police Station in Shelby, North Carolina, June 18, 2015. Police captured suspected killer Dylann Storm Roof, a 21-year-old with a criminal record, who is accused of killing nine people at a Bible-study meeting in a historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, in an attack U.S. officials are investigating as a hate crime. REUTERS/Jason Miczek
Mourners kneel outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015 a day after a mass shooting left nine dead during a bible study at the church. Dylann Roof, a 21-year-old white man, was arrested on Thursday on suspicion of having fatally shot nine people at the historic African-American church in South Carolina. The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Wednesday's attack as a hate crime, motivated by racism or other prejudice. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 18: An exterior view of Emanuel AME Church on June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Nine people were killed on June 17 in a mass shooting during a prayer meeting at the church. A 21-year-old suspect, Dylann Roof of Lexington, South Carolina, was arrersted Thursday during a traffic stop. Emanuel AME Church is one of the oldest in the South. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 18: (L-R) Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) pray with other members of the US Congress during a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston South Carolina, June 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. Police have arrested Dylann Roof, 21, of Lexington, South Carolina in the shooting that killed 9 people. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Police tape is seen outside the Emanuel AME Church, after a mass shooting at the Emanuel AME Church the night before in Charleston, South Carolina on June 18, 2015. Police captured a white suspect in a mass killing at one of the oldest black churches in the United States, the latest gun massacre to leave the country reeling. Police detained 21-year-old Dylann Roof, shown wearing the flags of defunct white supremacist regimes in pictures taken from social media, after nine churchgoers were shot dead. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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In January, U.S. District Judge Richard Gergel issued a court order that suggested unsealing almost 300 trial documents. But before these psychiatric records were opened, other court documents provided insights into Roof's mental state. As reported by The Post and Courier, forensic psychiatrist James Ballenger concluded that Roof exhibited signs of "Social Anxiety Disorder, Mixed Substance Abuse Disorder, a Schizoid Personality Disorder, depression by history, and possible Autistic Spectrum Disorder."

Federal officials are showing footage of Roof's prison visits with his family, according to the Associated Press. Roof's counsel reportedly wanted to screen the videos during his trial, but Roof dismissed the idea over concerns about his privacy. Roof later fired his lawyers so they couldn't show them.

The videos, which will be watched on Tuesday by select journalists, include an exchange where Roof asked his sister if the baby she had is transgender and another in which he urged any family members still distraught over his actions to move on.

The post Dylann Roof Said White Nationalists Would Save Him From Execution appeared first on Vocativ.

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