Study: Majority of Americans can't identify North Korea on a map


A new survey finds that most adults can't find North Korea on a map, according to a recent survey from The New York Times.

In late April, Kyle Dropp of Morning Consult surveyed 1,746 adults at The New York Time's request. Of that group, only 36 percent could correctly place the country on the map, according to his findings.

The study comes at a time when tensions are rising between North Korea and the U.S. over the authoritarian country's pursuit of nuclear weapons. North Korea over the weekend launched a ballistic missile.

Those who could correctly locate North Korea were more likely to support diplomatic and nonmilitary strategies – like economic sanctions and cyber attacks – in dealing with the country compared to those who could not, according to The New York Times.

7 PHOTOS
United States and South Korea Navies
See Gallery
United States and South Korea Navies

South Korean naval destroyers Sejong the Great and Yang Manchun, the U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Wayne E. Meyer, USS Michael Murphy and USS Stethem, the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain and the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson transit the western Pacific Ocean May 3, 2017. 

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

An F/A-18E Super Hornet launches from the U.S. Navy Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson during flight operations in the western Pacific Ocean May 2, 2017. Picture taken May 2, 2017. 

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets fly over South Korean destroyers Sejong the Great and Yang Manchun and the U.S. Navy Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinsonas they transit the western Pacific Ocean May 3, 2017. 

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

An F/A-18E Super Hornet lands on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain (L) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Wayne E. Meyer transit the western Pacific Ocean May 3, 2017. 

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

South Korean naval destroyers Sejong the Great and Yang Manchun, the U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Wayne E. Meyer, USS Michael Murphy and USS Stethem, the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain and the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson transit the western Pacific Ocean May 3, 2017.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

Sailors conduct flight operations aboard the U.S. Navy Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson in the western Pacific Ocean May 2, 2017. Picture taken May 2, 2017.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Handout via REUTERS)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Politically, Republicans were more likely to correctly locate North Korea at 37 percent compared to Democrats at 31 percent, according to the study. Independents eclipsed both with 39 percent answering correctly.

People who said they knew someone of Korean ancestry were most successful in identifying the country with 55 percent of the participants answering correctly. Education also played a notable role in the findings.

When broken down by education, the survey found that people with a post-graduate degree were the most likely to correctly place the country. Even then, only 53 percent of people with a post-graduate degree correctly identified North Korea, according to the survey.

Memories of the Korean War may have helped seniors better identify the country, the New York Times noted. People at least 65 years old were most likely to identify North Korea correctly with nearly half of those participants responding correctly.

21 PHOTOS
Photojournalist captures North Korea's celebration of leader Kim Il Sung
See Gallery
Photojournalist captures North Korea's celebration of leader Kim Il Sung
People walk between buildings after the opening ceremony of a newly constructed residential complex in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
North Korean soldiers march as they visit the newly constructed residential complex after its opening ceremony in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Thousands of people arrive for an opening ceremony of a newly constructed residential complex in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People carry flags after an opening ceremony for the newly constructed residential complex in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Men wearing uniforms check a newly constructed residential complex after its opening ceremony in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Women dressed in traditional costumes walk near the main Kim Il Sung square in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Women wear traditional clothes as North Korea prepares to mark Saturday's 105th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il-sung, North Korea's founding father and grandfather of the current ruler, in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
A man walks the the street decorated with flags as North Korea prepares to mark Saturday's 105th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il-sung, North Korea's founding father and grandfather of the current ruler, in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People practice for the expected parade on the main Kim Il-Sung Square in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Military officers visit the birthplace of North Korean founder Kim Il Sung, a day before the 105th anniversary of his birth, in Mangyongdae, just outside Pyongyang, North Korea April 14, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People react as a vehicle carrying foreign reporters passes towards the newly constructed residential complex before its opening in Ryomyong street in Pyongyang, North Korea April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Portraits of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung and late leader Kim Jong Il glow as people take part in a mass dance event marking the 105th birth anniversary of Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Soldiers check their souvenir photo as they visit the flower exhibition marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People sweep in front of statues of former North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People enjoy the Munsu water park in Pyongyang, North Korea April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People wait in line for a water slide as they enjoy the Munsu water park in Pyongyang, North Korea April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People gather at the entrance of a zoo in Pyongyang, North Korea April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Twin girls enjoy their time in a zoo in Pyongyang, North Korea April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People travel on escalators to enter a subway station in central Pyongyang, North Korea April 14, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
The sun set in Pyongyang, North Korea April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.