North Korean defector warns war 'unavoidable,' Kim Jong Un not afraid to use nuclear weapons

A defector from North Korea is cautioning against underestimating Kim Jong Un when it comes to nuclear weapons -- and he says President Donald Trump may be key to stopping him.

Song Byeok escaped from the North in 2002 and currently resides in South Korea. In a new interview, he told The Independent the threat of nuclear war is real as long as Kim Jong-un is in power.

SEE MORE: North Korea demands handover of suspects in assassination plot

"I think Kim Jong Un could wage nuclear war if his power is threatened and that is why he needs to be removed as soon as possible," he said.

The 48-year-old defector used to create propaganda art for the regime, now he creates protest work.

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North Korean defector Song Byeok
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North Korean defector Song Byeok
North Korean defector and painter Song Byeok explains his works during an interview with Reuters at his atelier in Seoul December 23, 2011. Above the ballooning dress of Marilyn Monroe is the face of North Korean despot Kim Jong-il who died a week ago. North Korean defector Song Byeok, who once proudly drew the "Dear Leader" in propaganda paintings and then became a slave labourer in one of the reclusive state's notorious prisons, has now turned to mock a ruler who led his country into famine, isolation and economic ruin. The picture was taken on December 23, 2011. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS OBITUARY SOCIETY)
North Korean defector and painter Song Byeok explains his work titled "Marilyn Monroe", which satirizes North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, at his atelier in Seoul December 23, 2011. Song, who previously worked as a propaganda painter in North Korea, defected to South Korea in 2002 and has since produced satirical paintings of the late North Korean leader and stereotypical imagery of the country. He had a debut exhibition of his paintings in January this year and will be having another exhibition in the U.S. in 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
North Korean defector and painter Song Byeok poses with his works, satirising late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, at his atelier in Seoul December 23, 2011. Song, who previously worked as a propaganda painter in North Korea, defected to South Korea in 2002 and has since produced satirical paintings of the late North Korean leader and stereotypical imagery of the country. He had a debut exhibition of his paintings in January this year and will be having another exhibition in the U.S. in 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (SOUTH KOREA) - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
North Korean defector and painter Song Byeok poses with his works satirising late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, at his atelier in Seoul December 23, 2011. Song, who previously worked as a propaganda painter in North Korea, defected to South Korea in 2002 and has since produced satirical paintings of the late North Korean leader and stereotypical imagery of the country. He had a debut exhibition of his paintings in January this year and will be having another exhibition in the U.S. in 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (SOUTH KOREA) - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
North Korean defector and painter Song Byeok uses a brush with his right hand on which a part of his index finger was severed by an injury when he was forced to work in a labour camp in North Korea, at his atelier in Seoul December 23, 2011. Song, who previously worked as a propaganda painter in North Korea, defected to South Korea in 2002 and has since produced satirical paintings of the late North Korean leader and stereotypical imagery of the country. He had a debut exhibition of his paintings in January this year and will be having another exhibition in the U.S. in 2012. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (SOUTH KOREA) - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)
TO GO WITH SKorea-NKorea-refugee-art-painting,FEATURE by Jung Ha-WonPhoto taken on January 24, 2011 shows North Korean defector Song Byeok speaking during an interview with AFP in Seoul. Song Byeok spent seven years churning out hundreds of paintings for Pyongyang's propaganda campaigns. AFP PHOTO / PARK JI-HWAN (Photo credit should read PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH SKorea-NKorea-refugee-art-painting,FEATURE by Jung Ha-WonPhoto taken on January 24, 2011 shows North Korean defector Song Byeok posing with his painting after an interview with AFP in Seoul. Song Byeok spent seven years churning out hundreds of paintings for Pyongyang's propaganda campaigns. AFP PHOTO / PARK JI-HWAN (Photo credit should read PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH SKorea-NKorea-refugee-art-painting,FEATURE by Jung Ha-WonPhoto taken on January 24, 2011 shows North Korean defector Song Byeok working during an interview with AFP in Seoul. Song Byeok spent seven years churning out hundreds of paintings for Pyongyang's propaganda campaigns. AFP PHOTO / PARK JI-HWAN (Photo credit should read PARK JI-HWAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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"He would wage nuclear war even if he knew it would mean finishing himself and harming the North Korean people because he is young and ambitious and doesn't care about the lives of North Koreans," he said.

He also warned that conflict with the dictator is "unavoidable" but that Trump might be able to help solve the problem

SEE ALSO: Here is the growing list of people fired while investigating Trump

"I really hope that Trump will remove Kim Jong-un – that is the only way that North Korean people can be free and happy," he said.

The Trump administration has stated on multiple occasions that all options are on the table concerning North Korea and Vice President Mike Pence noted last month that the U.S. is ready to "bring economic and diplomatic pressure to bear on the regime in North Korea" until the country ends its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.

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North Korea unveils new weapons at military parade
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North Korea unveils new weapons at military parade
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un applauds during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father, Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Missiles are driven past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other high ranking officials during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
High ranking military officers cheer as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives for a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People react as they march past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
TOPSHOT - Korean People's Army (KPA) tanks are displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Korean People's Army (KPA) soldiers march on Kim Il-Sung squure during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to people attending a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Military vehicles carry missiles with characters reading "Pukkuksong" during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Members of the Korean People's Army (KPA) ride on mobile missile launchers during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
An unidentified rocket is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
People carry flags in front of statues of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung (L) and late leader Kim Jong Il during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A soldier salutes from atop an armoured vehicle as it drives past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers attend a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Attendees carry sheets in colours of the national flag of North Korea during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers, some of them on horses, march during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Civilian attendees watch North Korean soldiers marching during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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Choe Il, North Korean ambassador to the U.K., has since dismissed these threats and indicated that the regime is planning on conducting its sixth nuclear test sometime in the future.

The interview comes on the heels of the election of South Korea's new president, who immediately launched international efforts to diffuse tension over North Korea's weapons development

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