Early humans co-existed with human-like species some 300,000 years ago

Paleontologists are revealing early humans actually co-existed with a human-like species some 300,00 years ago.

The cousin of homo sapiens, called homo naledi, was discovered in 2013 in a cave called Rising Star, outside of Johannesburg, South Africa.

The scientists thought that the new species roamed the earth over 2 million years ago, but now it is believed they may have roamed as early as 230,000 to 330,000 years ago according to Lee Berger, the lead researcher.

Naledi also shared characteristics with both more modern homo sapiens and some of our earlier ancestors like homo rudolfensis and habilis.

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Archaeologists excavate ancient Roman temple in Caesarea
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Archaeologists excavate ancient Roman temple in Caesarea
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
An archaeologist presents a head of the god Asclepius in the city of Caesarea, Israel April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
Archaeologists work at the site of King Herod� palace in the old city of Caesarea, Israel. April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
A shell with inscibed menorah on it, which was found at the archeological site is displayed in the old city of Caesarea, Israel April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
An archaeologist works at a site in the old city of Caesarea , Israel April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
A visitor sits under the queduct in the Old city of Caesarea, Israel April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
A worker takes part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
An archaeologist presents tools made of bone in the old city of Caesarea, Israel. April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
Sandbags are seen near what remained from the Crusader port at the Old City of Caesarea, Israel April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Amir Cohen
A worker takes part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Tourists walk around the site of King Herod� palace in the old city of Caesarea April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A bas-relief of the head of Medusa is seen on top of a sarcophagus displayed at the old city of Caesarea, Israel. April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
Beachgoers are seen on the beach near the aqueduct in the Old City of Caesarea, Israel, April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
People work during an archaeological excavation at the foot of the Crusader wall in the old city of Caesarea, Israel. April 26, 2017 REUTERS/Amir Cohen
Beachgoers are seen on the beach near the aqueduct in the Old City of Caesarea, Israel, April 26, 2017. REUTERS/Amir Cohen TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows fruit bats gathering inside a cave in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea, during the renovations of the ancient harbour. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows artifacts, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, on display during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows part of ancient synagogue, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, being displayed during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows artifacts, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, on display during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers take part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows artifacts, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, being displayed during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows artifacts, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, on display during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers take part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows an ancient aqueduct in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows the head part of a figurine from the Roman period depicting the Asclepius, god of medicine, discovered during the renovation of the ancient harbour of Caesarea, on display during a press conference in the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
People sit next to an ancient aqueduct on the shores of the Israeli Mediterranean town of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, during renovations of the ancient harbour. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers take part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on April 26, 2017, shows a general view of the renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers take part in renovations of a minaret at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker cleans a mosaic floor during renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker takes part in renovations at the ancient harbour of Caesarea on April 26, 2017, in the Israeli Mediterranean town. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ (Photo credit should read JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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The researchers also discovered that, although naledi had a much smaller brain than homo sapiens, they too used the advance technique of burying their dead, after finding almost perfectly preserved remains in very remote chambers that only "petite female spelunkers" could traverse.

The discoveries have made scientists rethink human evolution. Berger said: "We can no longer assume that we know which species made which tools or even assume that it was modern humans that were the innovators of some of these critical technological and behavioral breakthroughs in the archaeological record of Africa."

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