U.S. Republican Senator Graham to examine Trump's business deals -CNN

WASHINGTON, May 9 (Reuters) - U.S. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham said he wants to examine fellow Republican President Donald Trump's business dealings for any ties to Russia, CNN reported on Tuesday, one day after the issue was raised at a Senate hearing.

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Graham said it would be helpful to see Trump's tax records but that it was too soon to say whether he would be willing to subpoena them, according to CNN.

Representatives for Graham could not be immediately reached to confirm the report or give more details. Representatives for the White House also could not be immediately reached.

Click through images from testimony on Russian meddling in the 2016 election:

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Senate Judiciary subcommittee hears testimony on Russian meddling in the 2016 election
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Senate Judiciary subcommittee hears testimony on Russian meddling in the 2016 election
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) holds up a copy of 'The Kremlin Playbook' as Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC) listens at a hearing of the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates leaves a hearing of the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) shakes hands with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (R) at the conclusion of a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing about Russian intereference in the 2016 election in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates leave a hearing of the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates shake hands after testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates testify before the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates testify before the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 8: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates testify before the Senate Judicary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images)
James Clapper, former director of national intelligence, listens during a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing with former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, May 8, 2017. Yates is expected to be questioned about how blunt a warning she gave the incoming administration that Lieutenant General Flynn had provided a misleading account of a telephone conversation with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. during Trump's transition to the White House. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates are sworn in before testifying to the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 8: (From L to R) Senator John Cornyn, Senator Lindsey Graham, and Senator Sheldon Whitehouse before the start of the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Elections and former Trump advisor Ret. General Michael Flynn in Washington, United States on May 8, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 8: Senator Sheldon Whitehouse questions former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Elections and former Trump advisor Ret. General Michael Flynn in Washington, United States on May 8, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism, makes an opening statement during a hearing with former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, May 8, 2017. Yates is expected to be questioned about how blunt a warning she gave the incoming administration that Lieutenant General Flynn had provided a misleading account of a telephone conversation with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. during Trump's transition to the White House. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: The Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism ranking member Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) delivers opening remarks during a hearing about Russian interference in the 2016 election in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, Yates testified that she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill May 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. Before being fired by U.S. President Donald Trump, former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates said she had warned the White House about contacts between former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and Russia that might make him vulnerable to blackmail. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates arrive to testify before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on ?Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election? on Capitol Hill in Washington, U .S., May 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
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Graham asked former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper at a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing on Monday whether he had concerns about Russian ties to Trump's business interests. Clapper said he could not comment because the issue could be a subject of an ongoing investigation.

Graham on Tuesday said he intended to look into Trump's business ties to see whether any connections exist between Russia and the Trump campaign or the president's associates and would monitor the FBI's investigation to see how it could affect a Senate probe. (Reporting by Susan Heavey and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

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