The Pentagon wants Trump to send thousands of more troops into Afghanistan

President Donald Trump's senior military and foreign policy advisers have called for expanding the U.S.'s military role in Afghanistan to counter a resurgent Taliban, the Washington Post reported.

Trump administration officials are recommending sending in 3,000 to 5,000 more troops, which would essentially put the US back on a war footing with the Taliban. US forces will be used to stop the Taliban from gaining further ground in Afghanistan, and bring the Islamic militant group back to the negotiating table with the Afghan government.

The exact number of troops, however, will depend on how many soldiers NATO is willing to supply, an anonymous US defense official told Stars and Stripes.

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James Mattis travels to Afghanistan
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis looks out over Kabul as he arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis is saluted by a member of his U.S. Army helicopter crew as he arrives at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis checks his watch as he arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A U.S. soldier mans a gun at the back gate aboard the helicopter carrying U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis as he arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (R) and senior advisor Sally Donnelly (L) arrive via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (R) gives senior advisor Sally Donnelly (L) a thumbs-up as they discuss their schedule upon arriving via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (C) boards a helicopter to fly from Hamid Karzai International Airport to Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (3rd R) is greeted by U.S. Army Command Sergeant Major David Clark (L) and General Christopher Haas (2nd R) as he arrives at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (in black dress shoes) walks with U.S. Army leaders across a NATO logo as he arrives at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani (R) meets with U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (L) and his delegation at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (C) is greeted by Presidential Palace staff as he arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (R) is greeted by Presidential Palace staff as he arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (center right) is greeted by Presidential Palace staff as he arrives to meet with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (R) and U.S. Army General John Nicholson (L), commander of U.S. Forces Afghanistan, arrive to meet with an Afghan defense delegation at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani (2nd R) meets with U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (2nd L) and his delegation at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis (C) and U.S. Army General John Nicholson (2nd L), commander of U.S. Forces Afghanistan, meet with Afghanistan's National Directorate of Security Director Mohammad Masoom Stanekzai (R) and other members of the Afghan delegation at Resolute Support headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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"NATO needs to contribute the majority of the forces," the official said.

The new military strategy would also give the Pentagon, not the White House, the authority to set troop numbers in Afghanistan. It would also give the military more authority to use airstrikes against the Taliban, and lift Obama-era restrictions that limited the mobility of US military advisers on the ground.

In late April, Trump also gave the Pentagon the authority to set troop levels in Iraq and Syria. The Afghanistan strategy, however, will still need his approval to be put in action.

U.S. President Donald Trump (L) arrives to board Air Force One for travel to New York from Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. May 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst Thomson Reuters

Some inside the White House are opposed to the troop surge and have begun calling it "McMaster's War," in reference to General H.R. McMaster, Trump's national security adviser, who has spearheaded the new strategy in the White House.

White House insiders, however, recently said that Trump and McMaster have been clashing. But after that report emerged, Trump publicly said: "I couldn't be happier with H.R. He's doing a terrific job."

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Those oppposed to the strategy have argued that the Obama-era surge did not bring about any Taliban concessions, and that the US needs to stop "feeding failure."

Although officials said it's unknown how the president will view the new Afghan strategy, as he is spoken very little about America's longest running war, which is going on 16 years.

There are currently about 8,400 US troops, and 4,900 NATO soldiers in Afghanistan.

Trump is expected to make a decision on the strategy before the May 25th NATO summit in Brussels.

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