Explosion at Mexico fireworks depot kills at least 14

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - At least 14 people were killed, including five children, and scores more were injured in an explosion at a house where fireworks were stored in central Mexico's Puebla state, authorities said on Tuesday.

The blast occurred on Monday night in San Isidro, Chilchotla, during preparations for a local festival next week.

"A group of people lived in the house where the pyrotechnic material was stored for use in the festivities. A firework launched by someone outside (the house) fell on top of the fireworks, causing the explosion that knocked down the home," the government of Puebla said in a statement.

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Explosion at house where fireworks were stored in Mexico
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Explosion at house where fireworks were stored in Mexico
Residents recover belongings from debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
Residents recover belongings from debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A votive candle is seen next to a religious image of Our Lady of Guadalupe near debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A dog is seen amidst debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
Residents walk next debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
Residents stand next debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A general view shows residents standing next debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A resident arranges votive candles next a religious image of Our Lady of Guadalupe near debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A resident arranges votive candles next a religious image of Our Lady of Guadalupe near debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
Residents walk amidst the debris after fireworks stored in a house exploded in San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
A blood stain is seen at the site of the explosion of a house where fireworks were stored in the town of San Isidro, Chilchotla, Mexico, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Imelda Medina
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Nine people were killed on the spot and five more died after being taken to nearby hospitals. Earlier, 30 people were reported injured.

A senior official in the Puebla state government, Diodoro Carrasco, told a local radio station that despite state laws on storing fireworks it was difficult to prevent these types of accidents.

A series of massive explosions destroyed a fireworks market outside the Mexican capital in December, killing at least 35 people, injuring dozens and leaving the market a charred wasteland.

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Deadly explosion at Mexico fireworks market
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Deadly explosion at Mexico fireworks market

A massive explosion guts Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Mexico City, on December 20, 2016. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(JOSE LUIS TOLENTINO/AFP/Getty Images)

#BREAKINGNEWS 60 injured as explosion rips through open-air fireworks market in Tultepec, Mexico… https://t.co/zXR7qKzemj

Aerial view of Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec suburb, Mexico State, after a massive explosion on the eve killed at least 32 people, on December 21, 2016. Mexico worked Wednesday to identify charred bodies left by an explosion at its biggest fireworks market, as authorities investigated what caused the multi-colored salvo of destruction. Forensic experts are carrying out genetic analyses to identify the badly burned remains from Tuesday's blast, with just 13 victims identified so far, said state prosecutor Alejandro Gomez.

(MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

A massive explosion guts Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec on December 20, 2016 killing at least 31 people. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(JOSUE SOLANO/AFP/Getty Images)

Police officers stand guard on December 21, 2016 at Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec after a massive explosion killed at least 31 people on the eve. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)

A damaged car is seen at the disaster site after an explosion at a firework market in Tultepec, Mexico on December 21, 2016. At least 29 people were killed Tuesday when an explosion occurred at a fireworks market in a suburb of Mexico City, authorities said.

(Photo by Manuel Velasquez/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

People douse the embers amid the debris left by a huge blast that occured in a fireworks market in Mexico City, on December 20, 2016 killing at least 25 people and injuring dozens. The conflagration, in the suburb of Tultepec, set off a quickfire series of multicolored blasts and a vast amount of smoke that hung over Mexico City.

(RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Aerial view of Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec suburb, Mexico State, after a massive explosion on the eve killed at least 32 people, on December 21, 2016. Mexico worked Wednesday to identify charred bodies left by an explosion at its biggest fireworks market, as authorities investigated what caused the multi-colored salvo of destruction. Forensic experts are carrying out genetic analyses to identify the badly burned remains from Tuesday's blast, with just 13 victims identified so far, said state prosecutor Alejandro Gomez.

(MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Juan Carlos Alcala holds a photograph of his son Juan Antonio, who he is being searched for after an explosion at a fireworks market, outside the Forensic Medical Service (SEMEFO) in Tlalnepantla, Mexico December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Ginnette Riquelme)

A massive explosion guts Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec, on December 20, 2016. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(ISRAEL GUTIERREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Security forces arrive on December 21, 2016 at Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec after a massive explosion killed at least 31 people on the eve. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)

A massive explosion guts Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Mexico City, on December 20, 2016. The explosion killed at least 31 people and injured 72, authorities said. The conflagration in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec set off a quick-fire series of multicolored blasts that sent a vast cloud of smoke billowing over the capital.

(JOSUE SOLANO/AFP/Getty Images)

Forensic experts inspect the disaster site after an explosion at a firework market in Tultepec, Mexico on December 21, 2016. At least 29 people were killed Tuesday when an explosion occurred at a fireworks market in a suburb of Mexico City, authorities said.

(Manuel Velasquez/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Concepcion Baez shows a picture of her relatives Eva Baez and Jazmani Gonzalez, as she asks for information on December 21, 2016 at Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Mexico City's Tultepec suburb after a massive explosion killed at least 31 people on the eve. Thirty one people are known to have died in the Tuesday blast. Forensic experts are working on genetic analyses of the bodies because nearly all are impossible to identify. Rescue workers were still searching for bodies -- or survivors -- in the smoldering wreckage of the market in the Mexico City suburb of Tultepec, which was packed with customers buying pyrotechnics for traditional end-of-year festivities.

(PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)

A forensic expert inspects the disaster site after an explosion at a firework market in Tultepec, Mexico on December 21, 2016. At least 29 people were killed Tuesday when an explosion occurred at a fireworks market in a suburb of Mexico City, authorities said.

(Manuel Velasquez/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Fire fighters put out smoldering embers amid the debris left by a huge blast that occured in a fireworks market in Mexico City, on December 20, 2016 killing at least 26 people and injuring scores. The conflagration, in the suburb of Tultepec, set off a quickfire series of multicolored blasts and a vast amount of smoke that hung over Mexico City.

(ISRAEL GUTIERREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Firefighters work amid the debris left by a huge blast that occured in a fireworks market in Mexico City on December 20, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring 70, according to police. The conflagration, in the suburb of Tultepec, set off a quickfire series of multicolored blasts and a vast amount of smoke that hung over Mexico City.

(RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Relatives react while standing outside a hospital where victims of an explosion at the San Pablito fireworks market are being treated in Zumpango, Mexico December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Aerial view of Mexico's biggest fireworks market in Tultepec suburb, Mexico State, after a massive explosion on the eve killed at least 32 people. Mexico worked Wednesday to identify charred bodies left by an explosion at its biggest fireworks market, as authorities investigated what caused the multi-colored salvo of destruction. Forensic experts are carrying out genetic analyses to identify the badly burned remains from Tuesday's blast, with just 13 victims identified so far, said state prosecutor Alejandro Gomez.

(MARIO VAZQUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Rescuers search amid the debris left by a huge blast that occured in a fireworks market in Mexico City, on December 20, 2016 killing at least nine people and injuring 70, according to police. The conflagration, in the suburb of Tultepec, set off a quickfire series of multicolored blasts and a vast amount of smoke that hung over Mexico City.

(RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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(Reporting by Veronica Gomez and Anahi Rama; Writing by Anthony Esposito; Editing by Frances Kerry)

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