82 Chibok girls released in swap with Nigerian government

The Nigerian government says 82 of the Chibok girls held hostage by Boko Haram have been released.

It happened as part of an exchange for several Boko Haram suspects who were in Nigerian custody.

Two hundred seventy-six girls were taken from their boarding school in the middle of the night in April 2014. The government has been negotiating with Boko Haram for months.

SEE MORE: 2 Years After Her Kidnapping, A Chibok Schoolgirl Has Returned Home

"We have gone quite far with negotiations for, you know, hopefully another batch of the girls," Nigerian Vice President Yemi Osinbajo said in April.

Dozens of the girls escaped right after the kidnapping. One girl was found in May of last year after wandering out of a forest, and 21 were freed in October.

Their kidnapping and the politics surrounding it prompted the Bring Back Our Girls campaign — something even former first lady Michelle Obama took part in.

More than 100 girls are still being held hostage.

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Chibok girls released by Boko Haram in Nigeria
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Chibok girls released by Boko Haram in Nigeria
A still image taken from video shows a girl sitting with her arm in a sling as a group of girls, released by Boko Haram jihadists after kidnapping them in 2014 in the north Nigerian town of Chibok, are welcomed by officials in Abuja, Nigeria, May 7, 2017. REUTERS/via Reuters TV
A still image taken from video shows a group of girls, released by Boko Haram jihadists after kidnapping them in 2014 in the north Nigerian town of Chibok, sitting in a hall as they are welcomed by officials in Abuja, Nigeria, May 7, 2017. REUTERS/via Reuters TV
Two buses carrying the newly released chibok girls turn under the bridge at the airport junction in Abuja, Nigeria May 7, 2017. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde.?
One of the buses carrying the newly released chibok girls leaves the Nnamdi Azikwe international airport in Abuja, Nigeria May 7, 2017. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
Police disrupt a rally by the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, which is protesting in Nigeria's capital Abuja to mark 1,000 days since over 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their secondary school in Chibok by Islamist sect Boko Haram, Nigeria January 8, 2017. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
Police disrupt a rally by the #BringBackOurGirls campaign, which is protesting in Nigeria's capital Abuja to mark 1,000 days since over 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their secondary school in Chibok by Islamist sect Boko Haram, Nigeria January 8, 2017. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
Members of the #BringBackOurGirls campaign rally in Nigeria's capital Abuja to mark 1,000 days since over 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their secondary school in Chibok by Islamist sect Boko Haram, Nigeria January 8, 2017. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
The mother of one of the 21 Chibok school girls released by Boko Haram is seen during the girls' visit to meet President Muhammadu Buhari In Abuja, Nigeria October 19, 2016. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
A parent of one of the abducted Chibok school girls cries after the police prevented the parents access to see President Muhammadu Buhari during a rally in Abuja, Nigeria August 25, 2016. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
The mother of one of the 21 Chibok school girls released by Boko Haram is seen during the girls' visit to meet President Muhammadu Buhari in Abuja, Nigeria October 19, 2016 REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
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