Guatemala's Fuego volcano spews ash, local authorities on alert

Guatemala's Fuego volcano belched black ash high into the sky at dawn on Friday, May 5th, with authorities placing local authorities from nearby villages on high alert.

Guatemala's volcanic monitor, Insivumeh, said in a statement that thick columns of ash reached between 34,000 feet and 37,000 feet above sea level, amid loud explosions and extended new lava flows.

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Guatemala's Fuego volcano
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Guatemala's Fuego volcano

The Fuego volcano, seen from San Juan Alotenango municipality, Sacatepequez department, about 65 km southwest of Guatemala City, erupts on November 10, 2015. Emergency service officials in Guatemala on Tuesday issued an orange alert over increasing eruptions from the country's southeastern Fuego volcano and ordered the evacuation of a nearby hotel. The 12,346-foot high colossus -- whose name means 'fire' in Spanish -- showed heightened activity overnight, sending columns of ash high into the sky, spilling lava down its side and provoking small tremors.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

A picture taken through a helicopter window shows an aerial view of the Fuego (L) and the Acatenango volcanoes in the Escuintla departament, 80 km south of Guatemala City on April 7, 2016.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Lava flows from Fuego volcano during an eruption as seen from Alotenango, on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Guatemala, March 1, 2016. Picture taken March 1, 2015.

(REUTERS/Josue Decavele)

Lava flows from Fuego volcano during an eruption as seen from Alotenango, Guatemala, July 1, 2015. The National Coordinator of Disaster Reduction (CONRED) issued an orange alert as volcanic activity intensifies at the Volcan de Fuego, local media reported. Picture taken July 1, 2015.

(REUTERS/Josue Decavele)

The Fuego volcano, seen from the Alotenango municipality, Sacatepequez department, about 65 km southwest of Guatemala City, erupts on July 1, 2015. The volcano spewed lava and columns of ash into the air and authorities have raised the alert level in the area to orange.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Lava flows from Fuego volcano during an eruption as seen from Alotenango, on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Guatemala, March 2, 2016.

(REUTERS/Josue Decavele)

The Colima or Fuego volcano spews ash and smoke on January 23, 2017, as seen from La Yerbabuena, Colima State, Mexico. The Colima volcano is one of the most active in Mexico and in the last days its activity has intensified.

(HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)

Ash billows from the Fuego volcano, as seen from the Palin municipality, Escuintla departament, 40 km south of Guatemala City on July 29, 2016. The volcano spewed lava and columns of ash into the air prompting authorities to raise the alert level in the area to orange.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

The Fuego volcano, seen from Palin municipality, Escuintla department, about 55 km southwest of Guatemala City, erupts on July 1, 2015. The volcano spewed lava and columns of ash into the air and authorities have raised the alert level in the area to orange.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

A view of the Fuego volcano in Alotenango, Sacatepequez region May 26, 2012. The yellow alert was issued twice in the last week due to volcanic activity at the Fuego volcano, according to the National Coordinator of Disaster Reduction (CONRED). The volcano, about 25 miles southwest of the capital, erupted about 2:45 a.m. (0745 GMT) on May 19, 2012, spewing a column of ash up to 16,400 feet above the crater and launching burning red lava nearly 1,300 feet high.

(REUTERS/Jorge Dan Lopez)

Ash billows from the Fuego volcano, as seen from the Palin municipality, Escuintla departament, 40 km south of Guatemala City on July 29, 2016. The volcano spewed lava and columns of ash into the air prompting authorities to raise the alert level in the area to orange.

(JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

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According to Insivumeh's statement, ash was swept more than 12 miles towards the south, southwest and west and fell in the areas of San Pedro Yepocapa, Sangre de Cristo, Panimache I and II.

Local media reported that the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction (Conred) has not yet reported damages after the explosion, which is the fourth so far this year.

The volcano is located about 30 miles southwest of the Guatemalan capital.

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