North Korea says third American they've detained committed 'hostile criminal acts'

SEOUL, May 3 (Reuters) - North Korea said on Wednesday an American man it had detained in late April, the third U.S. citizen being held by the isolated country, was intercepted because he was attempting to commit "hostile acts."

The state-run KCNA news agency said the American, identified last month as Kim Sang Dok, was arrested on April 22 at the Pyongyang airport for committing "hostile criminal acts with an aim to subvert the country."

The latest information about Kim's detention comes as tensions on the Korean peninsula run high, driven by concerns that the North might conduct its sixth nuclear test in defiance of U.S. pressure and United Nations sanctions.

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A missile is carried by a military vehicle during a parade to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the signing of a truce in the 1950-1953 Korean War, at Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang July 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Lee (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY ANNIVERSARY)
Engineers check the base of Unha-3 (Milky Way 3) rocket sitting on a launch pad at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, during a guided media tour by North Korean authorities in the northwest of Pyongyang April 8, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
A North Korean scientist looks at a monitor showing the Unha-3 (Milky Way 3) rocket on a launch pad at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, at the satellite control centre of the Korean Committee of Space Technology on the outskirts of Pyongyang April 11, 2012. North Korea said on Wednesday it was injecting fuel into a long-range rocket ahead of a launch condemned by its neighbours and the West. The launch is set to take place between Thursday and next Monday and has prompted neighbours such as the Philippines to re-route their air traffic. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A soldier stands guard in front of the Unha-3 (Milky Way 3) rocket sitting on a launch pad at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, during a guided media tour by North Korean authorities in the northwest of Pyongyang April 8, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
North Korean soldiers salute in a military vehicle carrying a missile during a parade to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the signing of a truce in the 1950-1953 Korean War, at Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang July 27, 2013. REUTERS/Jason Lee (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY ANNIVERSARY)
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A scientist stands beside the Kwangmyongsong-3 application satellite, to be put onto the Unha-3 (Milky Way 3) rocket at the West Sea Satellite Launch Site, during a guided media tour by North Korean authorities in the northwest of Pyongyang April 8, 2012. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
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The United States is negotiating with China, North Korea's sole major ally, about a stronger U.N. Security Council response, although Washington has also reiterated that all options for dealing with the North remain on the table.

North Korea, which has been criticized for its human rights record, has in the past used detained Americans to extract high-profile visits from the United States, with which it has no formal diplomatic relations.

KCNA said on Wednesday Kim had taught an accounting course in Pyongyang.

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"Invited to Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST) to teach accounting as a professor, he was intercepted for committing criminal acts of hostility aimed to overturn the DPRK not only in the past but also during his last stay before interception," KCNA news agency said, using North Korea's official name of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Law enforcement officials were investigating Kim's alleged crime, it said.

Kim, who also goes by his English name Tony Kim and is in his 50s, was detained at Pyongyang International Airport as he attempted to leave the country, the university's chancellor had said previously.

PUST said in an email to Reuters that it did not believe Kim's detention was related to his work at the university.

A PUST spokesman, who asked not to be identified, said Kim's wife, who was with him when he was arrested, had since returned to the United States.

"Mrs Kim left the DPRK and is now back in the USA with family and friends," the spokesman said. "We certainly hope for a positive resolution as soon as possible."

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Entering the capital city of Pyongyang, visitors pass through the Arch of Reunification. The two women holding a conjoined North and South Korea symbolize supreme leader Kim Il Sung's vision for the two countries.

(Photo by Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images)

Immediately, visitors are struck by the Workers' Party Monument. The outer belt reads, "Long live the Workers' Party of Korea, the organizer and guide of all victories of the Korean people!"

(Photo by Mark Edward Harris/Getty Images)

Downtown Pyongyang's skyline is punctuated by the 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, currently the tallest abandoned building in the world. It hasn't had any work done on it since 1992.

(Photo via REUTERS/Bobby Yip)

On the other side of the city, the 558-feet-tall Juche Tower looms above the Taedong River.

(Photo by Tim Johnson/MCT/MCT via Getty Images)

Some of North Korea's most impressive (and intimidating) architecture lives in the city center, such as the sprawling Manyongdae Children's Palace. It features two "arms" meant to imitate a mother's embrace.

(Photo by NK News/Getty Images)

North Korea doesn't have enough of its own electricity, so at night the entire country goes pitch black. What little remains goes toward illuminating a picture of the country's founder, Kim Il-Sung.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

These buildings wouldn't be possible without the thousands of laborers who are forced to work long hours to build them.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

The conditions are often poor, if not downright treacherous.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

Much of the country's architecture is meant to honor North Korea's leaders, Kim Il-Sung, who led between 1972 and 1994, and Kim Jong Il, who followed Sung until his own death in 2011.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

The two men are proudly memorialized all around Pyongyang, most obviously at the People's Grand Assembly Hall.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

Nearby is the Fatherland Liberation War Museum, which celebrates Korea's victory over the imperialist American forces during the Korean War.

(Photo by Xiaolu Chu/Getty Images)

One building in central Pyongyang reads, "The great comrades Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il will be with us forever."

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

Disregarding the blatant propaganda, there are many aspects of North Korean architecture that are genuinely impressive. The metro station is among the most ornate in the world.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

Perhaps unsurprisingly, North Korea is also home to the largest sports arena in the world, May Day Stadium.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

Filled to capacity, it's capable of holding 150,000 people. Most often, it's used for the annual Mass Games, which pay tribute to the country's history.

(Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Amid the bleakness of everyday life, people also manage to find time to have fun at the Munsu Water Park.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

Science also plays a big role in North Korea. The Sci-Tech Complex, for example, was built in the shape of an atom and opened in early 2015.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

The country's leader, Kim Jong Un, has said he hopes the center will help "advance the establishment of a rich and powerful fatherland through the locomotive of science and technology."

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

The structure joins the Mirae Scientists Street, which North Korea wants to use as its hub for becoming a global force in innovation.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

Some apartment buildings sport solar panels.

(Photo via REUTERS/Staff)

Many of the buildings stand out for their bold color palettes and industrial feel.

(Photo via REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)

But others, like the Wonsan Baby Home and Orphanage, opt instead for bright pastels.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

Completed in June of 2015, the home is spread across several floors. Its blues and yellows stand in stark relief to the concrete that dominates so much of North Korea's landscape.

(Photo via REUTERS/KCNA)

Whatever bright spots there may be, from far away the skyline clearly reveals North Korea's obsession with power and might.

(Photo credit ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

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The other two Americans already held in North Korea are Otto Warmbier, a 22-year-old student, and Kim Dong Chul, a 62-year-old Korean-American missionary.

Warmbier was detained in January 2016 and sentenced to 15 years hard labor for attempting to steal a propaganda banner.

Two months later, Kim Dong Chul was sentenced to 10 years hard labor for subversion. Neither has appeared in public since their sentencing. (Reporting by Ju-min Park; Editing by Paul Tait)

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