'Undisclosed' podcast gives listeners access to a new true-crime perspective

There's no lack of podcasts of the true crime genre, but Undisclosed offers something different for audiences. Instead of trying to solve a mystery or a simple retelling, Undisclosed gives the audience a look into the legal side of crimes. Not only that, but the podcast analyzes the shortcomings of the criminal justice system.

AOL.com spoke to Undisclosed's executive producer Dennis Robinson about the podcast. Robinson is a lawyer by trade and has worked in nonprofit and fundraising. This project came about through a collaboration with Rabia Chaudry. Chaudry is the personal advocate of public advocate of Adnan Syed, the man at the center of the podcast powerhouse Serial.

Chaudry and Robinson teamed up to raise funds for Syed; Undisclosed came about originally as another source of crowdfunding. It took off, however, and has found an audience of its own.

According to Robinson, Undisclosed "accidentally stumbled upon an audience." Unlike Serial and many true crime podcasts, this one "focuses on the law, not narrative."

"It found an audience that cares about digesting the case ... there's an audience who wants to get deep in legal analysis." Undisclosed is "not the typical podcast where trying to entertain," Robinson said, "we're also trying to educate."

Undisclosed doesn't underestimate the audience. Rather, it gives them access to complicated material of controversial cases. The first season focused on The State v. Adnan Syed -- the focus of Serial -- and the second is about The State v. Joey Watkins.

Currently, Undisclosed is focused on Freddie Gray, a man who died in police custody in 2015. April 21 was the two-year anniversary. No officers were convicted of his death.

Robinson considers the podcast part of a larger movement that coincides with social activism. It "parallels feeling of wanting to be a part of something bigger than yourself," he said.

Undisclosed is proudly distributed by Audioboom. Robinson said the company will continue to bring audiences revolutionary podcasts.

Listen to Undisclosed here.

See protests of the Freddie Gray court decision

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Protests in response to mistrial in Freddie Gray case
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Protests in response to mistrial in Freddie Gray case
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Protesters march through the streets after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on the third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Protesters confront Baltimore City Police officers as they march through the streets after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on the third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
A protester speaks to policeman in reaction to a mistrial declared in the trial of police officer William Porter in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. The manslaughter trial of a Baltimore policeman accused over the death in custody of African-American Freddie Gray was declared a mistrial after the jury failed to reach a verdict, putting the city on edge. Police were out in force in parts of the gritty East Coast city in a bid to avoid a repeat of the riots and looting that erupted after the death in April of the 25-year-old Gray, the latest in a series of high-profile cases of perceived police brutality in the United States. AFP PHOTO/MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters march in Baltimore after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddie Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Protesters gather at the site of last Aprils riots after todays mistrial in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on third day of deliberations in PorterÃs trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray.Ã (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: A protester holds a sign at the site of last Aprils riots after todays mistrial in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on third day of deliberations in PorterÃs trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray.Ã (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Police stand guard as protesters march through the streets hours after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on the third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Protesters march through the streets hours after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Protesters march in Baltimore after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddie Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
BALTIMORE MD- DECEMBER 16: Law enforcement warns the displeased protesters that they are breaking the law as they react to the mistrial declared in the Freddie Gray Case at the Baltimore City Circuit County Court for Baltimore officer William G. Porter accused of involuntary manslaughter in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. (Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake, left, and Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, right, during a news conference at police headquarters with other city officials to discuss plans for dealing with the reaction to the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
Protesters march around City Hall in Baltimore after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddie Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
Police stand outside the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse after the hung-jury was announced in the trial of Police Officer William Porter, in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. The manslaughter trial of a Baltimore policeman accused over the death in custody of African-American Freddie Gray was declared a mistrial after the jury failed to a reach a verdict, putting the city on edge. AFP PHOTO/ MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: A protester yells at members of the Baltimore City Sheriffs Department in front of the Baltimore City City Circuit Courthouse East, after a mistrial was declared in the trial of Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The judge declared a mistrial on third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
One protestor tries to calm another after officers from the Baltimore Sheriff's Department arrested a protestor across the street from Courthouse East following the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
Officers from the Baltimore Sheriff's Department try to secure the area as they arrest a protestor across the street from Courthouse East after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddie Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
A demonstrator holds a sign during the trial of Police Officer William Porter at Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. AFP PHOTO/MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters react outside Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse after the hung-jury was announced in the trial of Police Officer William Porter, in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. The manslaughter trial of a Baltimore policeman accused over the death in custody of African-American Freddie Gray was declared a mistrial after the jury failed to a reach a verdict, putting the city on edge. AFP PHOTO/ MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Officers from the Baltimore Sheriff's Department arrest a protestor across the street from Courthouse East after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddie Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
A demonstrator holds a sign during the trial of Police Officer William Porter at Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. AFP PHOTO/MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
Police arrest a protester outside Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse after the hung-jury was announced in the trial of Police Officer William Porter, in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. The manslaughter trial of a Baltimore policeman accused over the death in custody of African-American Freddie Gray was declared a mistrial after the jury failed to a reach a verdict, putting the city on edge. AFP PHOTO/ MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - DECEMBER 16: Protesters hold signs in front of the Baltimore City City Circuit Courthouse East, while a jury continues deliberations in Baltimore police Officer William G. Porter's trial, December 16, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The jury is in its third day of deliberations in Porter's trial, which is the first of six trials of police officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Protesters march along Calver Street in Baltimore, outside the courthouse after the announcement of a hung jury in the trial of Officer William Porter in the Freddy Gray case, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. (Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images)
Police stand outside the Baltimore City Circuit Courthouse after the hung-jury was announced in the trial of Police Officer William Porter, in Baltimore, Maryland on December 16, 2015. The manslaughter trial of a Baltimore policeman accused over the death in custody of African-American Freddie Gray was declared a mistrial after the jury failed to a reach a verdict, putting the city on edge. AFP PHOTO/ MOLLY RILEY / AFP / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
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