Congress debating one major change to airline policy

In the wake of a string of high-profile incidents of passengers being removed from planes, several lawmakers are in the process of proposing new airline policies.

United has recently said customers who give up their seat on overbooked flights could receive up to $10,000, but many officials want to prevent passengers from getting bumped altogether.

There are a number of bills that would ban removing someone involuntarily, like the Customers Not Cargo Act.

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No. 12: Frontier Airlines

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No. 11: Spirit Airlines 

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No. 10: ExpressJet 

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No. 9: American Airlines 

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No. 8: United Airlines 

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No. 7: SkyWest Airlines 

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No. 6: Southwest Airlines 

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No. 5: Hawaiian Airlines 

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No. 3: Virgin America

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No. 2: Delta Air Lines 

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No. 1: Alaska Airlines 

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According to the Hill, the bill from Sen. Chris Van Hollen wants airlines to provide incentives for customers to exit planes on their own or to resolve the issue before boarding.

Another bill, the Transparency, Improvements and Compensation to Keep Every Ticketholder Safe (TICKETS) Act, goes one step further.

It would make it so once a passenger is on board a plan, they could be removed unless there's a safety issue.

The legislation would also require the airline to list its overbooking policies and place a limit on compensation for giving up your seat.

Other similar bills include Rep. Neal Dunn's Secure Equity in Airline Transportation (SEAT) Act, Rep. Jan Schakowsky's Bumping on Overbooked Airplanes Requires Dealing Fairly (BOARD Fairly) Act and the Passengers Bill of Rights proposed by Sen. Richard Blumenthal.

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