Mystery of 100-year-old Antarctic 'Blood Falls' has finally been solved

Scientists have been wondering for more than 100 years why a glacier in Antarctica seems to be bleeding.

According to a study recently published in the Journal of Glaciology, there's actually a simple explanation for the gruesome "Blood Falls" at the Taylor Glacier.

A large source of salty water turns the water blood red, then streaks down the bright white surface for an ominous look.

That find led to yet another discovery -- liquid water can exist within a frozen glacier. Salt water has to be colder than fresh water to freeze, so some of it remains liquid.

A from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado College found that the glacier not only has a lake underneath it, it also has its own water system which has been flowing for all of human history.

Taylor Glacier is now the coldest known glacier with persistently flowing water.

See photos of the phenomenon:

8 PHOTOS
"Blood Falls" in Antarctica
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"Blood Falls" in Antarctica
Photo: National Science Foundation
General view of the Blood Falls and the Taylor Glacier while in flight during a visit by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
The Taylor Glacier is seen in this aerial view while in flight during a visit by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flies over the Taylor Glacier area near McMurdo Station, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
Mount St. Helens emits a plume of steam and ash October 1, 2004, from an area of new crevasses in the crater glacier south of the 1980-86 lava dome. The event lasted approximately 25 minutes and created a pale-gray cloud that reached an altitude of almost 10000 ft. The image was taken at an altitude of 27,000 ft aboard a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion aircraft assigned to the "Screaming Eagles" of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) stationed at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington. Mount St. Helens spewed more steam and ash Monday, raising concerns about a larger eruption at the Washington state volcano that woke last week after 18 years of slumber. Picture taken October 1, 2004 and released October 5, 2004. EDITORIAL USE ONLY REUTERS/U.S. Navy/Scott Taylor HB/
TOPSHOT - This general view shows an aerial view of the Taylor Glacier near McMurdo Station on November 11, 2016 while in flight during a visit by US Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica. Kerry is travelling to Antarctica, New Zealand, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Morocco and will attend the APEC summit in Peru later in the month. / AFP / POOL / Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - This general view shows an aerial view of Blood Falls and the Taylor Glacier near McMurdo Station on November 11, 2016 while in flight during a visit by US Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica. Kerry is travelling to Antarctica, New Zealand, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Morocco and will attend the APEC summit in Peru later in the month. / AFP / POOL / MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
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