New Mexico teacher criticized for 'inappropriate' bathroom passes

Students at a New Mexico school are upset at a bathroom pass one teacher passes out.

The pass, from teacher Donna Cravey's math class, says "don't get confused" above boys and girls' signs. It is seen as a jab to the recent controversies concerning transgender people and what bathroom the law deems they should use.

High school junior Colin Barz shared the pass on Twitter:

"You okay with this?" Barz asked the account for Albuquerque Public Schools. They answered, saying they are addressing the issue:

Like Barz, some students felt that the passes were unacceptable. "High school is a place where you're supposed to find yourself, and what you want to do and where you want to go," George Martinez told KRQE News. "It's just not healthy for students to feel like they can't be themselves around school."

Others, however, feel that the teacher did not mean to offend. "Years ago, it was not a controversial topic," said Matthew Farmer, junior in the math class. "It is nowadays, I just don't think that she sees that and doesn't understand."

Albuquerque Public Schools spokeswoman, Monica Armenta, told KRQE News that the passes were inappropriate. Last year, the school system instated that students can go to whatever bathroom corresponds with their gender identity.

See the fight for and against gender neutral bathrooms

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Protests for and against gender-neutral bathrooms

A sign protesting a recent North Carolina law restricting transgender bathroom access is seen in the bathroom stalls at the 21C Museum Hotel in Durham, North Carolina May 3, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

A man holds up a sign supporting North Carolina's anti-transgender bathroom law following Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump' campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., August 18, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Opponents of North Carolina's HB2 law limiting bathroom access for transgender people protest in the gallery above the state's House of Representatives chamber as the legislature considers repealing the controversial law in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. on December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

Civil rights leader Reverend William Barber, president of the NAACP in North Carolina, speaks to the media inside the state's Legislative Building as lawmakers gather to consider repealing the controversial HB2 law limiting bathroom access for transgender people in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. on December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

A gender-neutral bathroom is seen at the University of California, Irvine in Irvine, California September 30, 2014. The University of California will designate gender-neutral restrooms at its 10 campuses to accommodate transgender students, in a move that may be the first of its kind for a system of colleges in the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

Transgender people and their supporters have been fighting for repeal of House Bill 2, a North Carolina law that requires people in government buildings to use the bathroom of the gender on their birth certificate.

(John D. Simmons/Charlotte Observer/TNS via Getty Images)

Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Supporter of HB2 Lee Churchill from Raleigh, N.C. holds a sign stating her position outside the North Carolina House and Senate chambers gallery on Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016 as the North Carolina General Assembly convenes for a special session at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, N.C.

(Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

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