Trump breaks with Obama, leaves out climate change in Earth Day statement

President Donald Trump released an official statement Saturday commemorating Earth Day, but did not directly reference climate change, marking a shift from past administrations.

"Americans are rightly grateful for these God-given gifts and have an obligation to safeguard them for future generations. My Administration is committed to keeping our air and water clean, to preserving our forests, lakes, and open spaces, and to protecting endangered species," reads the official White House statement.

SEE ALSO: Thousands turn out for March for Science in US cities

However the president's message on the 47th annual worldwide day urging people to "build a global citizenry fluent in the concepts of climate change and aware of its unprecedented threat to our planet," failed to directly mention climate change.

Instead, the president defended his administration's environmental plans, saying, "Rigorous science is critical to my Administrations efforts to achieve the twin goals of economic growth and environmental protection."

Click through images from March for Science around the world:

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2017 March for Science around the world
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2017 March for Science around the world
Mary Devine of Levittown, Long Island looks on during the Earth Day 'March For Science NYC' demonstration to coincide with similar marches globally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., April 22, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Protesters line Central Park West during the Earth Day 'March For Science NYC' demonstration to coincide with similar marches globally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., April 22, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Demonstrators hold placards during the "March for Science Stockholm" manifestation at Medborgarplatsen square in Stockholm, Sweden April 22, 2107. TT News Agency/Marc Femenia/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. SWEDEN OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SWEDEN
People with signs walk in Times Square during the March for Science on April 22, 2017 in New York. Thousands of people joined a global March for Science on Saturday with Washington the epicenter of a movement to fight back against what many see as an 'assault on facts' by populist politicians. / AFP PHOTO / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold up signs during the March for Science April 22, 2017 in New York. Scientists and their supporters across the globe are expected to march in the thousands Saturday amid growing anxiety over what many see as a mounting political assault on facts and evidence. / AFP PHOTO / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold up signs at a rally before the March for Science April 22, 2017 in New York. Scientists and their supporters across the globe are expected to march in the thousands Saturday amid growing anxiety over what many see as a mounting political assault on facts and evidence. / AFP PHOTO / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 22: Scientists and supporters gather on the National Mall for the rally before the March for Science on April 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. The event is being described as a call to support and safeguard the scientific community. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - 2017/04/22: Researchers and scientist protesting against budget cuts in science during the March for Science. (Photo by Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - 2017/04/22: Researchers and scientist protesting against budget cuts in science during the March for Science. (Photo by Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images)
People hold up signs at a rally before the march for Science April 22, 2017 in New York. Scientists and their supporters across the globe are expected to march in the thousands Saturday amid growing anxiety over what many see as a mounting political assault on facts and evidence. / AFP PHOTO / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 22: Gabrielle Walters, 21, poses for photographs in front of The White House before heading to the National Mall for the March for Science on April 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. Ms. Walters traveled from Florida with four college classmates who are all studying for a degree in Coastal Environmental Science. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
A protestor holds a placard as scientists and science enthusiasts participate in the 'March for Science' which celebrates the scientific method, in Westminster, central London on April 22, 2017, Earth Day. Thousands of people rallied in support for science in Europe and Australasia on April 22, ahead of a march in Washington, triggered by rising concern over populism and so-called alternative facts. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman attends a 'March for Science', held worldwide, on April 22, 2017 in Vienna. The March for Science is a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies, and governments. / AFP PHOTO / APA / HANS PUNZ / Austria OUT (Photo credit should read HANS PUNZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Scientists and science enthusiasts gather prior to the start of the 'March for Science' which celebrates the scientific method outside the Science Museum in central London on April 22, 2017, Earth Day. Thousands of people rallied in support for science in Europe and Australasia on April 22, ahead of a march in Washington, triggered by rising concern over populism and so-called alternative facts. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 22: People gather in front of Humboldt University in support of scientific research during the 'March for Science' demonstration on April 22, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. People all over the world are participating in 'March for Science' demonstrations to protest against the statements and polices of the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump that deride scientific facts deemed inconvenient for Trump's political agenda. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Scientists and science enthusiasts gather prior to the start of the 'March for Science' which celebrates the scientific method, outside the Science Museum in central London on April 22, 2017, Earth Day. Thousands of people rallied in support for science in Europe and Australasia on April 22, ahead of a march in Washington, triggered by rising concern over populism and so-called alternative facts. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
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"My Administration is committed to advancing scientific research that leads to a better understanding of our environment and of environmental risks," Trump's statement reads.

In former President Obama's final Earth Day statement in 2016 climate change was the primary focus and is mentioned by name throughout the message--five times to be exact.

"Just as the people who came together on Earth Day in 1970 embraced their responsibility to preserve our planet, today we face a threat that also requires collective action," said Obama.

"Human activity is disrupting the climate, and the challenge of combating climate change is one that will define the contours of our time. The effects of climate change are already evident in stronger storms, deeper droughts, more rapidly eroding soil, and longer wildfire seasons -- and as of last year, 14 of the 15 warmest years on record have occurred since 2000."

The last Republican in office, President George W. Bush, also cited the environmental epidemic in his final Earth Day statement: "We are taking positive steps to confront the important challenge of climate change. Our work is not done."

"We also have a responsibility to pass on to future generations our commitment to the environment," said Bush in 2007.

During his presidency Bush only explicitly cited climate change once in his Earth Day statements, while Obama did so every year with the exception of two election years: 2010 (midterms) and 2012.

Trump's dismissal of the issue shouldn't come as a major surprise, in the past the president has called evidence supporting man-made climate change a "hoax" and "bulls***."

"I'm not a believer in man-made global warming. It could be warming, and it's going to start to cool at some point," said Trump during the 2016 campaign. "But the problem we have, and if you look at our energy costs, and all of the things that we're doing to solve a problem that I don't think in any major fashion exists."

Trump closed out his first official statement on Earth Day as president of the United States by saying, "This April 22nd, as we observe Earth Day, I hope that our Nation can come together to give thanks for the land we all love and call home."

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