Woman caught on camera overdosing before crash

WAUKESHA COUNTY (WITI) -- A dose of reality for a Waukesha County woman who is alive because of a car crash. Video of her dying in the driver's seat went viral, and the incident gave her a second chance at life.

If you could sketch a person's promise, and outline her untapped potential, each pencil stroke inspired by her personality, popularity, passion and persistence, a portrait would appear of a young woman named Katrina Henry.

"I've always been a 'good kid.' I don't drink. I like to paint. I like to draw. I work out. I was a cheerleader throughout high school. I had an internship. I did research with my professor, and always had at least two jobs. I would have considered myself a very successful person," Henry said.

If you could hear how that picture was torn apart, how the pieces fell into the abyss of addiction and the will to survive slipped away, it would sound like this:

"I felt so alone. Worthless. Almost hopeless. I felt like I was never going to get help now. Like, who's going to help me now. It broke my spirit," Henry said.

Video was recorded on March 21, near Hopkins and Glendale. Police said a suspected overdose led Henry to crash her vehicle into a parked car.

RELATED: Photos from scene of the crash

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Woman caught on camera overdosing before crash
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Woman caught on camera overdosing before crash
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
Wisconsin woman said a video of her overdosed behind the wheel of her car after she was involved in a car accident went viral and ultimately saved her life.
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Earlier in March, a criminal complaint accuses Henry of spitting at an officer responding to a report she may be trying to kill herself. She had been previously ordered to not take any narcotics and to maintain complete sobriety.

"They took me to the hospital, handcuffed me to the bed. I died. I overdosed and died," Henry said.

Henry said she doesn't remember much from what could have been the last moments of her life -- the overdose that nearly killed her, or the crash that certainly saved her.

"Nope, not at all," Henry said. "There was no driving and I'm starting to get tired or anything. Everything was black. I don't know how that happened."

She does remember well how she got hooked.

"I started using Percocets. A boyfriend of mine kind of got me into it. I didn't really know what they were, and so I started doing them with him and then when I wouldn't do them, all of a sudden I would get sick, and I was like, 'oh my gosh, I'm addicted to these,'" Henry said.

The pills helped erase what was inside.

"I've had a lot of bad things happen to me in my life, so it just kept building and building, and it was my only release. Or so I thought. Numb the pain. Took me away. Didn't have to deal with the pain. Didn't have to deal with feeling worthless, and like a failure and a loser, and I'd tell my mom -- I just feel like such a loser. I thought that I was doing everything to be successful in life," Henry said.

The drugs, however, were deceptive. They turned on her, like an underground enemy. The more she did, the more worthless she felt -- a bigger failure, a bigger loser, all alone with her lie.

"I didn't want to admit it. I was lying. I was like 'I'm fine,'" Henry said.

Of course, she wasn't, but the warning signs weren't enough for her to admit her addiction.

"I started losing interest in things," Henry said.

Sliding into a deeper depression wasn't enough. Getting arrested wasn't enough. An armed robbery wasn't enough.

"All of a sudden a guy busts through the door with a gun and tells us all to get on the ground, and I was so scared," Henry said.

It wasn't until that day in March, when she was driving after snorting what she thought was cocaine, that she received her final warning -- recorded on camera for the world to see. The drug was likely laced with fentanyl. Within minutes, Henry's life began to slip away.

The viral video of her head bent back into oblivion and her stumbling to life after being injected with Narcan spawned a tirade of hate on social media.

"I'm getting messages from people saying they wish I would have died. I think it was very cruel," Henry said.

RELATED: Number of drug overdoses by state

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Drug overdose deaths per state, 2015
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Drug overdose deaths per state, 2015

North Dakota

Deaths per 100,000: 2.7

(Photo by Ben Harding via Getty Images)

South Dakota

Deaths per 100,000: 6.4

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nebraska

Deaths per 100,000: 7.3

(Photo via Getty Images)

Iowa

Deaths per 100,000: 8.7

(Photo via Getty Images)

Minnesota

Deaths per 100,000: 9.4

(Photo by Andrey Krav via Getty Images)

Virginia

Deaths per 100,000: 9.5

(Photo via Getty Images)

Texas

Deaths per 100,000: 9.8

(Photo via Getty Images)

New York

Deaths per 100,000: 10.6

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Mississippi

Deaths per 100,000: 10.7

(Photo via Getty Images)

Georgia

Deaths per 100,000: 10.8

(Photo via Alamy)

Kansas

Deaths per 100,000: 11.1

(Photo via Shutterstock)

California

Deaths per 100,000: 11.3

(Photo via Getty Images)

Hawaii

Deaths per 100,000: 11.8

(Photo by Richard Akuaten via Getty Images)

Maine

Deaths per 100,000: 11.9

(Photo by James Metcalf via Getty Images)

Illinois

Deaths per 100,000: 11.9

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Alabama

Deaths per 100,000: 12

(Photo by Rob Hainer via Getty Images)

Arkansas

Deaths per 100,000: 12.1

(Photo by Joe Sohm via Getty Images)

Oregon

Deaths per 100,000: 12.5

(Photo by Bob Pool via Getty Images)

Idaho

Deaths per 100,000: 12.8

(Photo via Getty Images)

Vermont

Deaths per 100,000: 12.9

(Photo by Denis Tangney Jr. via Getty Images)

South Carolina

Deaths per 100,000: 13

(Photo by Getty Images)

North Carolina

Deaths per 100,000: 13

(Photo via Getty Images)

Wisconsin

Deaths per 100,000: 13.1

(Photo by Henryk Sadura via Getty Images)

New Jersey

Deaths per 100,000: 13.1

(Photo by Denis Tangney Jr. via Getty Images)

Connecticut

Deaths per 100,000: 13.1

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Maryland

Deaths per 100,000: 13.4

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Getty Images)

Montana

Deaths per 100,000: 13.4

(Photo via Getty Images)

United States average

Deaths per 100,000: 13.5

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Massachusetts

Deaths per 100,000: 13.7

(Photo via Corbis)

Florida

Deaths per 100,000: 13.9

(Photo via Alamy)

Washington

Deaths per 100,000: 14.1

(Photo via Getty Images)

Louisiana

Deaths per 100,000: 14.4

(Photo via Alamy)

Michigan

Deaths per 100,000: 14.5

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Hampshire

Deaths per 100,000: 14.5

(Photo via Getty Images)

Washington, D.C.

Deaths per 100,000: 14.9

(Photo by Mark Segal via Getty Images)

Alaska

Deaths per 100,000: 15.3

(Photo by Sam Diephuis via Getty Images)

Colorado

Deaths per 100,000: 15.8

(Photo by David Parsons via Getty Images)

Indiana

Deaths per 100,000: 15.8

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Wyoming

Deaths per 100,000: 16.4

(Photo by Getty Images)

Missouri

Deaths per 100,000: 16.4

(Photo by Henryk Sadura via Getty Images)

Delaware

Deaths per 100,000: 17.2

(Photo by Ron Chapple via Getty Images)

Tennessee

Deaths per 100,000: 17.6

(Photo via Getty Images)

Arizona

Deaths per 100,000: 18.1

(Photo via Getty Images)

Pennsylvania

Deaths per 100,000: 18.7

(Photo via Getty Images)

Ohio

Deaths per 100,000: 18.9

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Rhode Island

Deaths per 100,000: 19.6

(Photo via Kenneth C. Zirkel via Getty Images)

Oklahoma

Deaths per 100,000: 20.3

(Photo via Getty Images)

Utah

Deaths per 100,000: 21.9

(Photo via Getty Images)

Nevada

Deaths per 100,000: 22.4

(Photo by Andrew Zarivny via Shutterstock)

Kentucky

Deaths per 100,000: 24

(Photo via Getty Images)

New Mexico

Deaths per 100,000: 24.4

(Photo via Getty Images)

West Virginia

Deaths per 100,000: 32.4

(Photo by Stan Rohrer via Getty Images)

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Henry said she realizes the crash saved her life.

"As ashamed that I am that I hit that woman's car, I'm also glad. No one would have found me. I would have died there," Henry said.

And the video gave her a second chance.

"I don't think I would have taken it as seriously. In a split second your life can change," Henry said.

Her life actually changed the first day she did the Percocet.

"I had no idea what they'd do to me. I had no idea," Henry said.

On that day, the clock started ticking. The rest was just a matter of time.

"You have no idea what's in those drugs. It could be anything. Drug dealers don't care what they're selling you. They're just trying to make money. They may not even know what it is. People my age, they just don't think anything of using drugs. I'm not using that as an excuse, but it kind of, to me, normalized it -- and I just want people to admit it and go get help. You don't need to be ashamed of yourself," Henry said.

Henry said she believes it was the shame that held her back.

"I was so embarrassed. I always told myself that I would never end up like that. Talking makes you feel so much better. It makes you feel like you're not alone. I felt so alone, that I was the only one dealing with this problem, and that no one would understand. I don't feel hopeless and worthless anymore, and I know I was brought back for a reason, and I'm going to live up to my full potential. I'm not going to be feeling like a loser, feeling down on myself, feeling like I don't matter. I clearly do. I just had to have it taken away from me, or almost taken away from me, in order for me to feel like I am worth something. That maybe I am here for a reason," Henry said.

As of Wednesday, April 19, Henry was in her third week of therapy and drug treatment.

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