Voters increasingly feel Democrats support their views on these 2 key issues

Although Republicans have a GOP president in the White House, a new poll says that Americans feel Democrats better represent their views on two key issues.

A Pew Research survey says that when handling foreign policy, 49 percent of voters feel that Democrats are better at it, compared to 36 percent of Republicans.

It was the reverse just last year.

And 50 percent of those surveyed say that Democrats would handle immigration better than Republicans who came in at 39 percent.

President Trump's tough stance on immigration has created plenty of controversy in his first 100 days.

Despite the ups and downs of each party, apparently both parties have lost favorability points since January with Republicans dropping from 47 percent to 40 percent and Democrats from 51 percent to 45 percent.

Interestingly, voters say they see Republicans becoming less divided, while democrats saw an 11 point jump, saying 48 percent of the party has become "mostly divided."

RELATED: Democrats who could challenge Trump in 2020

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Democrats who could challenge Trump in 2020
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Democrats who could challenge Trump in 2020

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) - In her new book, Warren reveals for the first time that she considered running in 2016, when liberals were begging her to enter the race. This year, Warren joined the Armed Services Committee, filling a major national security gap in her resume. First though, she'll have to win reelection next year in Massachusetts, where some Warren allies expect Republicans to spend heavily to defeat or at least damage her.

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) - Booker is a crowd favorite whenever he speaks to Democratic audiences and is expected to headline several party fundraising events this year. One of the few African-Americans in the Senate, Booker has a big social media following and is a darling of the Manhattan donor class. His precedent-breaking testimony against Attorney General Jeff Sessions was a high-profile event that endeared him to many on the left.

REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) - Sanders won millions of votes during his unexpectedly strong presidential primary bid last year, which gave him a massive following and small-dollar donor base that's the envy of many Dems. He's the most popular politician in America, according to some surveys, and inspires enthusiastic loyalty. But Sanders would be 78 in 2020, and while his age doesn't seem to slow him down, Democrats may want a fresher face. 

REUTERS/Mary Schwalm

Former Gov. Martin O'Malley (MD) - No one has shown more interest in 2020 so far than O'Malley, who has been traveling to key states to campaign for Democrats and who told NBC News in January that he "just might" run for president again. O'Malley failed to crack 1% in the Iowa caucuses last time around. But he was convinced there no room for anyone in a race so clearly defined by Hillary Clinton and Sanders, and insists that he could perform better under different circumstances.

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) - With a reality TV star-turned-politician in the White House, some Democrats think the comedian-turned-politician would be the perfect foil. His book out next month, sarcastically titled, "Al Franken, Giant of the Senate," could be a signal of higher ambition.

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Joe Biden - The former vice president ran for the top job twice and nearly did a third time in 2016. Could he really make a go of it in 2020? "Never say never," Biden told "Late Show" host Stephen Colbert. "You don't know what's going to happen. I mean, hell Donald Trump's gonna be 74. I'll be 77 and in better shape. I mean, what the hell?"

Photo by Brad Barket/WireImage

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) - Gillibrand has long been seen as potential presidential material, and her decision to vote against almost every one of Trump's Cabinet nominees has earned her renewed praise on the left. A recent profile in New York magazine further edged her toward the national stage.

Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (NY) - Cuomo has built record of accomplishments in his time leading New York State, including the recent passage of a universal college tuition program, even though he's also racked up some detractors along the way. And unlike some of the other 2020 possibles, he's hardly shown a relish for taking on Trump.

Photo by Brad Barket/WireImage

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) - The former California Attorney General just got to the Senate in January, but many party insiders think she's interested in higher office and that she would be a formidable candidate for the White House. Political talent scouts have been watching her for years, with a 2015 Washington Post headline asking, "Is Kamala Harris the next Barack Obama?"

Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images

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