Nervous Hawaiians want to revive Cold War nuclear shelters

With Vice President Mike Pence hanging out in Korea's demilitarized zone on Monday to warn North Korea that it should not "test [Trump's] resolve or the strength of the armed forces of the United States" and North Korea responding by telling the BBC that it plans to continue weekly missile tests and threaten an "all-out war" if the United States tries anything, it's understandable that people who live in the vicinity of North Korea might be a little nervous.

Some lawmakers from the state that is one of the geographically closest to North Korea — Hawaii — are asking the state for funding to update its nuclear attack response plans and facilities, which haven't been updated in decades.

Hawaii's House Public Safety Committee voted on Thursday to pass a resolution that said the state "faces increased risks from natural and man-made disasters mainly because of environmental climate change and geopolitical conflicts" and therefore it's in the state's "best interest" to update its fallout shelters, which were plentiful on the islands and stocked with supplies and food in the '80s but have since fallen into disrepair.

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un applauds during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father, Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Missiles are driven past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other high ranking officials during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
High ranking military officers cheer as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives for a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People react as they march past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
TOPSHOT - Korean People's Army (KPA) tanks are displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Korean People's Army (KPA) soldiers march on Kim Il-Sung squure during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to people attending a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Military vehicles carry missiles with characters reading "Pukkuksong" during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Members of the Korean People's Army (KPA) ride on mobile missile launchers during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
An unidentified rocket is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
People carry flags in front of statues of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung (L) and late leader Kim Jong Il during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A soldier salutes from atop an armoured vehicle as it drives past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers attend a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Attendees carry sheets in colours of the national flag of North Korea during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers, some of them on horses, march during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Civilian attendees watch North Korean soldiers marching during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
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The committee's vice chairman, Democrat Matt LoPresti, took advantage of the resolution's passage to get in a few digs at the current administration, which he feels is responsible for the resolution being introduced in the first place.

"At a time when we have this kind of saber-rattling and really blustering foreign policy, it does make people a little nervous," LoPresti told Hawaii News Now. He added that the shelters aren't just for nuclear attacks; they can also be used for natural disaster attacks, like hurricanes.

The resolution has a long way to go through Hawaii's legislature before it can becomes law, including the House's finance committee and votes from both parts of Congress.

Hawaii is 4,661 miles away from North Korea, and the nation is not commonly believed to have missiles that can reach that far, though it's not out of the realm of possibility that it does. It's certainly true that the country is feverishly trying to build them.

For now, though, an expert from the Cato Institute told Wired that the best he thought North Korea could do was hit "unpopulated parts of Alaska." Still, it never hurts to be prepared.

The post Nervous Hawaiians Want To Revive Cold War Nuclear Shelters appeared first on Vocativ.

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U.S. Vice President Mike Pence visits the National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence is greeted by National Assembly Speaker Chung Sye-kyun during their meeting in Seoul, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence talks with National Assembly Speaker Chung Sye-kyun during their meeting in Seoul, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence shakes hands with U.S. soldier during a meeting with U.S. and South Korean soldiers at Camp Bonifas near the truce village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence answers a reporter's question at the truce village of Panmunjom, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks toward the north from an observation post inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence stands next to his daughter looking toward the north through a pair of binocular from an observation post inside the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence visits the National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence arrives at Camp Bonifas near the truce village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 17, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence shakes hands with commander General Vincent K. Brooks during an Easter fellowship dinner at a military base in Seoul, South Korea, April 16, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, left, burns incense at the National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, April. 16, 2017. REUTERS/Ahn Young-joon/Pool
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, third left, shakes hands with military officials at Camp Bonifas near the truce village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, on Monday, April 17, 2017. Pence�encouraged China to take action against North Korea while he met with troops a day after Kim Jong Un's regime defied the Trump administration with a ballistic missile test. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - APRIL 16: U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence arrive at Osan airbase on April 16, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. During the three day visit to South Korea, Vice President Pence will spend Easter Sunday with the U.S. and S. Korean troops and their families. He will also meet with Korea's acting president Hwang Kyo-ahn, the national assembly speaker Chung Sye-kyun and local business leaders. (Photo by Song Kyung-Seok-Pool/Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - APRIL 17: (L to R) U.S. Vice President Mike Pence talks with South Korean acting president and prime minister Hwang Kyo-ahn during their meeting on April 17, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. During the three day visit to South Korea, Vice President Pence spends Easter Sunday with the U.S. and S. Korean troops and their families, meet with Korea's acting president Hwang Kyo-ahn and the national assembly speaker Chung Sye-kyun, then meet with the local business leaders. (Photo by South Korean Acting President and Prime Minister Office- Pool/Getty Images)
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