Yellowstone euthanizes one of its 3 rare white wolves

Personnel at Yellowstone National Park are investigating the recent loss of one of its three known white wolves.

On Wednesday, hikers came upon the severely injured animal near Gardiner, Montana.

According to P.J. White, Chief of the Wildlife and Aquatic Resources Branch, "Staff on scene agreed the animal could not be saved due to the severity of its injuries. The decision was made to kill the animal and investigate the cause of the initial trauma."

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YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A National Park Service sign welcomes visitors to Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 25, 2014: A lodgepole pine leans toward the water on the bank of the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 25, 2014: Belgian Pool is one of numerous geothermal hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Originally known as Oyster Spring, it was renamed in 1929 after a tourist from Belgium fell into the hot water and later died. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A female moose (cow) stands in a forest clearing in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. According to the National Park Service, there are fewer than 200 moose (Alces alces shirasi) in the park. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A bison grazes on grasses in the Hayden Valley section of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
KEDIRI, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - 2014/03/02: Nature's new landscape, created by the eruption of Mount Kelud, barren wastes and new ravines etched into the terrain by flowing lava. Four people were killed, dozens injured and more than 100,000 people were evacuated from villages on the Indonesian island of Java, after Mount Kelud erupted on February 13, 2014, spewing ash and lava 17 km into the sky. Volcanic dust and sand spread to almost all regions in Java forcing the closure of three international airports in the region. The most dangerous consequence of Mount Keluds eruption will come with the flow of volcanic lava dust turned to mud that will flow when it starts to rain. Kelud is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is categorized as one of the worlds deadliest in the book Super Volcano: The Ticking Time Bomb Beneath Yellowstone National Park written by Greg Breining. In the last 1,000 years it has erupted 30 times. The most severe eruption occurred in 1586 which killed between ten and fifteen thousand people. An eruption in 1901 caused lava to flow up to 23 miles from the volcano and swept away hundreds of villages and killed 5,160 people. Another eruption in 1966 killed about 2,000 people. (Photo by Arief Priyono/LightRocket via Getty Images)
EAST JAVA, INDONESIA - 2014/02/19: Some residents watched the flood of volcanic ash and lava in the Konto River, in Kandangan, Kediri. Four people were killed, dozens injured and more than 100,000 people were evacuated from villages on the Indonesian island of Java, after Mount Kelud erupted on February 13, 2014, spewing ash and lava 17 km into the sky. Volcanic dust and sand spread to almost all regions in Java forcing the closure of three international airports in the region. The most dangerous consequence of Keluds eruption will come with the flow of volcanic lava dust turned to mud that will flow when it starts to rain. Kelud is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is categorized as one of the worlds deadliest in the book Super Volcano: The Ticking Time Bomb Beneath Yellowstone National Park written by Greg Breining. In the last 1,000 years it has erupted 30 times. The most severe eruption occurred in 1586 which killed between ten and fifteen thousand people. An eruption in 1901 caused lava to flow up to 23 miles from the volcano and swept away hundreds of villages and killed 5,160 people. Another eruption in 1966 killed about 2,000 people. (Photo by Arief Priyono/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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A press release issued by the National Park Service notes that "an investigation into the cause of the injuries has begun which will include a necropsy."

While wolves in the park generally live an average of 6 years, this particular one had reached the age of 12, notes Fox News.

Her longevity and unique coloring made her among the most recognized animals on park grounds.

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