Study finds most Americans are distracted drivers

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Americans are known for having a deep love for their cars and their portable phones, and a new study indicates that pretty much the entire nation is enjoying them at the same time.

As a mere 2 seconds of distracted driving can increase collision likelihood by 20 times, that's a bad thing. Making things worse, a study conducted by Zendrive shows average phone use accounted for 3.5 minutes of every driving hour.

Some states were certainly greater offenders than others, but none emerged as shining examples of driver responsibility.

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10 most common causes of death in the US
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Heart Disease: 614,348 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

(Photo by: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images)

Cancer: 591,699 deaths in 2014

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REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido 

Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease: 147,101 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

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Accidents (unintentional injuries): 136,053 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

Photo Credit: Getty 

Stroke: 133,103 deaths in 2014

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Alzheimer's disease: 93,541 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

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Diabetes: 76,488 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

Photo Credit: Press Association 

Influenza & pnuemonia: 55,227 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

Photo Credit Reuters 

Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis: 48,146 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

(Photo by: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images)

Suicide: 42,773 deaths in 2014

info provided by CDC

Photo Credit: Getty 

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Vermont, which actually has a law against using handheld phones while driving, is ranked as the most distracted. Each day, drivers in the state spent roughly 7.5 percent of their time behind the wheel on their devices. Vermont is followed by Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama.

Drivers in Oregon are most apt to keep their focus on the road, but still spent 3% of their time using their phones while driving each day.

According to Zendrive, its findings came through digging, "deep into our data set of 10-billion miles of driver behavior data," and pulling, "out a three month sample of 570-million trips, where 3.1-million people drove 5.6-billion miles around the U.S. between December 2016 and February 2017."

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KNUTSFORD, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 13: A youth poses as he rides a hoverboard, which are also known as self-balancing scooters and balance boards, on October 13, 2015 in Knutsford, England. The British Crown Prosecution Service have declared that the devices are illegal as they are are too unsafe to ride on the road, and too dangerous to ride on the pavement. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
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