You're definitely not the only person googling 'World War III'

If you've Googled some terrifying things in the past week, you're not alone.

Data from Google Trends shows that President Trump's recent military actions have instilled fear and curiosity throughout the world, sparking a giant spike in online searches for the term — you guessed it — "World War III."

According to the data, searches for World War III reached peak popularity on Google on April 7, the day after Trump ordered a missile strike on a Syrian airfield in response to a chemical weapons attack that killed at least 70 civilians.

16 PHOTOS
Color photos of London during World War II
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Color photos of London during World War II
UNITED KINGDOM - DECEMBER 16: Dufaycolor photograph. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. Dufaycolor was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - DECEMBER 10: A Dufaycolor colour transparency taken by an unknown photographer in about 1943. St Paul's was an inspiration to the nation during the Second World War. When much of the surrounding area was destroyed during the Blitz it seemed miraculous that St. Paul's survived. However, it was not completely unscathed. A bomb demolished the High Altar, and the Crypt suffered damage as did many of the stained glass windows. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - DECEMBER 10: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of the Old Bailey law courts damaged by German bombing, taken by an unknown photographer during World War Two. On 10 May 1941, in one of the worst raids of the London Blitz, a number of prominent buildings were damaged, including Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the British Museum and the Old Bailey. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. Dufaycolor was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED KINGDOM - DECEMBER 10: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of houses destroyed by bombing, taken by an unknown photographer in about 1943 during World War Two. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. Dufaycolor was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. The Mall is decorated with the flags of the Allied Powers, part of the celebrations to mark VE (Victory in Europe) Day and the end of World WarTwo in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of crowds on The Mall in London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. Traffic heads down the Mall towards Buckingham Palace as crowds gather to celebrate VE Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of Admiralty Arch, London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. The Mall is lined with the flags of the British Army, Navy and Air Force as crowds celebrate VE Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of the view up The Mall towards Admiralty Arch from Buckingham Palace, London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. The Mall is lined with flags as soldiers and civilians get ready to celebrate VE Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of Admiralty Arch in London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. The Arch stands decorated with the flags of the Allied Powers, part of the celebrations to mark VE (Victory in Europe) Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of Admiralty Arch in London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. Admiralty Arch stands decorated with the flags of the Allied Powers, part of the celebrations to mark VE (Victory in Europe) Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of The Palm House in Kew Gardens, London taken by an unknown photographer in about 1945. This huge 110 metre (363 foot) long greenhouse allows the cultivation of tropical plants from around the world. Designed by Decimus Burton (1800-1881) and Richard Turner (1798-1881) the Palm House was built in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew between 1844 and 1848. Constructed of wrought iron it has curved glass panels tinted green to provide shade. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - DECEMBER 10: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of barges on the River Thames in front of the Houses of Parliament, taken by an unknown photographer in about 1945. After the partial destruction of the Houses of Parliament by fire in 1834, work began on a new building in 1837. The architect was Sir Charles Barry (1795-1860), assisted by Augustus Welby Pugin (1812-1852). The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. Dufaycolor was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - DECEMBER 10: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of barges on the River Thames with the Tower of London in the background, taken by an unknown photographer in about 1945. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed and consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. Dufaycolor was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of Trafalgar Square in London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. Nelson's Column is decked with bunting and decorated with the flags of the Allied Powers, part of the celebrations to mark VE (Victory in Europe) Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 03: A Dufaycolor colour transparency of Admiralty Arch in London, taken by an unknown photographer in 1945. The Arch stands decorated with the flags of the Allied Powers, part of the celebrations to mark VE (Victory in Europe) Day and the end of World War Two in Europe. The Dufaycolor process was introduced as cine film in 1932 and as rollfilm for still photography in 1935. Based on Frenchman Louis Dufay's (1874-1936) Dioptichrome process of 1908, it was the last 'additive' colour process to be marketed. Dufaycolor consisted of a very fine, regular filter screen made up of red, green and blue lines printed on a film base. The process was popular with both amateur and professional photographers and survived until the 1950s. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
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As you can see from the results over the past 30 days, though the searches spiked the day after the strike, they've remained relatively high in the days following, showing a lingering confusion as to whether or not Trump plans on waging a war. Or, you know, if our own impending doom is upon us.

Widening the search parameters to January shows that this is the first time the search has spiked during Trump's presidency. But considering the U.S. just dropped a bomb so powerful it was infamously nicknamed the "mother of all bombs" in Afghanistan on Thursday, reportedly killing 36 ISIS fighters, it might not be the last.

Over the past five years, the "World War III" search only spiked in popularity one other time, following the Paris terror attacks that took place in November 2015.

Though people across the world are clearly curious about the status of war in the world today, fluctuating trend projections of questions like, "What is happening?" and "Is Trump an idiot?" show the world has been consistently confused since Trump took office.

This is fine.

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