Members of Congress are returning home to angry constituents and heated town halls

Members of Congress are home for two weeks for the Passover and Easter holidays.

But instead of a leisurely spring break, they're getting an earful from angry constituents, who are pummeling them with questions at town halls about everything from President Donald Trump's tax returns to the Republican health care plan.

Here's a list of the things constituents confronted their representatives about at town halls during the first week of congressional recess:

The Republican health care plan

Health care was what drove the majority of the Tea Party rage at town halls back in 2009. And health care is what's driving the rage at town halls in 2017. Voters of all stripes are furious at Republicans, both for trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and for the plan they unsuccessfully attempted to replace it with.

Rep. Mike Coffman (R-Colo.) got an earful from a Republican constituent who was aghast that Coffman would support the American Health Care Act, the House GOP health care plan that crashed and burned late last month.

Top most and least liked U.S. Senators

21 PHOTOS
Top most and least liked U.S. Senators
See Gallery
Top most and least liked U.S. Senators
Least Liked

T-9. Patrick Toomey, Pennsylvania

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 47%
No opinion: 15%

(Meredith Dake-O'Connor/CQ Roll Call)
Least Liked

T-9. Roy Blunt, Missouri

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 47%
No opinion: 15%

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Least Liked

8. Debbie Stabenow, Michigan

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 47%
No opinion: 16%

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Least Liked

7. Marco Rubio, Florida

Disapprove: 38% 
Approve: 52%
No opinion: 10%

(Photo credit MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Least Liked

6. Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts

Disapprove: 48% 
Approve: 56%
No opinion: 9%

(Photo by Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Least Liked

5. Claire McCaskill, Missouri

Disapprove: 39% 
Approve: 47%
No opinion: 15%

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Least Liked

4. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina

Disapprove: 40% 
Approve: 46%
No opinion: 14%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Least Liked

3. Lisa Murkowski

Disapprove: 40% 
Approve: 53%
No opinion: 7%

(Photo by Stephen J. Boitano/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Least Liked

2. John McCain, Arizona

Disapprove: 43% 
Approve: 51%
No opinion: 6%

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Least Liked

1. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky

Disapprove: 47% 
Approve: 44%
No opinion: 9%

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Most Liked

T-9. Ron Wyden, Oregon

Approve: 65%
Disapprove: 22%
No opinion: 13%

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Most Liked

T-9. Thomas Carper, Delaware

Approve: 65%
Disapprove: 22%
No opinion: 13%

(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Most Liked

8. Brian Schatz, Hawaii

Approve: 65%
Disapprove: 16%
No opinion: 19%

(AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Most Liked

7. John Thune, South Dakota

Approve: 66%
Disapprove: 27%
No opinion: 7%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Most Liked

6. Susan Collins, Maine

Approve: 67%
Disapprove: 27%
No opinion: 6%

(Photo by John Patriquin/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Most Liked

5. Angus King, Maine

Approve: 67%
Disapprove: 23%
No opinion: 10%

(Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Most Liked

4. Michael Enzi, Wyoming

Approve: 68%
Disapprove: 18%
No opinion: 14%

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

Most Liked

3. John Barrasso, Wyoming

Approve: 69%
Disapprove: 17%
No opinion: 14%

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Most Liked

2. Patrick Leahy, Vermont

Approve: 70%
Disapprove: 22%
No opinion: 7%

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Most Liked

1. Bernie Sanders, Vermont

Approve: 75%
Disapprove: 21%
No opinion: 4%

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

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"I'm sorry to say I was shocked when you declared your intention to vote for the American Health Care Act," Steven Haas, who identified himself as a registered Republican, told Coffman at a town hall Wednesday night. "That is not the way we do things here in Colorado."

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) was also shouted down over the issue, with constituents chanting "health care for all" at him as they pressed him to back a single-payer system.

"I will continue to support, as much as I can, our free-market system of health care," Flake told the crowd, who booed his response, according to the Arizona Republic.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch

Flake lamented Gorsuch's confirmation process at his Thursday night town hall, calling Gorsuch the "first Supreme Court justice ever to be filibustered."

Constituents at his town hall, however, were not buying Flake's complaints, booing his comments and raising the issue of Merrick Garland, Barack Obama's SCOTUS nominee whom Republicans refused to give a hearing, let alone a vote.

Where Neil Gorsuch stands on key issues

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Where SCOTUS nominee Neil Gorsuch stands on key issues
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Where SCOTUS nominee Neil Gorsuch stands on key issues

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch looks on as Senate Judiciary Committee. President Donald Trump has nominated Judge Gorsuch to the Supreme Court to fill the seat that had left vacant with the death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Abortion

Gorsuch has never directly ruled on Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that legalized abortion in the U.S., but he was pressed on the landmark ruling during his Senate confirmation hearing. 

When Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) asked Gorsuch what he would have done if President Trump asked him to overturn Roe v. Wade, the judge responded, "I would have walked out the door. It's not what judges do. I don't do it at that end of Pennsylvania Avenue and they shouldn't do it at this end either, respectfully."

Some refer to passages from a book Gorsuch wrote on assisted suicide. In the book, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, Gorsuch wrote, "The idea that all human beings are intrinsically valuable and the intentional taking of human life by private persons is always wrong."

(Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Second Amendment

Gorsuch has never directly ruled on the Second Amendment. However, during his confirmation hearing, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.) questioned Gorsuch on District of Columbia v. Heller -- a landmark ruling that overturned a ban on handguns and certain requirements when storing guns in Washington D.C. 

Gorsuch offered limited responses to Feinstein's questioning, but did conclude that Heller was the "law of the land." 

(REUTERS/John Sommers II/File Photo)

Religion

Gorsuch is widely regarded as a strong proponent of religious liberty.

In a landmark ruling, Gorsuch sided with an employer in the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. case in 2013, making it legal for a non-profit organization to deny employees access to contraceptives if it goes against their religious beliefs. The case ultimately reached the Supreme Court, where it was also ruled in the favor of Hobby Lobby. 

In another case, Gorsuch ruled in favor of a Wyoming inmate. The ruling allowed the inmate to use a prison yard sweat lodge, that he had previously been denied access to, for Native American religious worship.

(Getty)

Immigration

Gorsuch has not hinted to how he feels about President Trump's proposed travel ban, and many experts are split on how the SCOTUS nominee would vote on the executive order that bans immigrants from six majority-Muslim countries. The ban is currently suspended following rulings by federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland. 

Gorsuch has sided with immigrants in past cases, and as Cornell University constitutional law professor Michael Dorf noted to the Denver Post -- "Gorsuch’s sympathy for people in religious cases, a general skepticism of executive power and a history of ruling for immigrants give some reason to think he could be sympathetic to plaintiffs challenging a ban on people from certain countries."

(REUTERS/Eric Thayer)

Environment

In the 2015 case Energy and Environment Legal Institute vs. Epel, Gorsuch sided with a Colorado law that requires 20 percentage of electricity sold in the state to be from renewable sources. The case was filed by an out-of-state coal company, claiming the law was a threat to interstate commerce. 

(REUTERS/Jim Urquhart)

LGBTQ rights

When pressed about gay rights and strict interpretations of the law by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, (D-Calif.) during his confirmation hearing, Gorsuch responded that "no one is looking to return us to horse and buggy days."

"We’re trying to interpret the law faithfully, taking principles that are enduring and a Constitution that was meant to last ages and apply it and interpret it to today’s problems." 

Gorsuch also told the Senate Judiciary Committee, "A good judge starts with precedent and doesn’t reinvent the wheel. So to the extent, there are decisions on these topics — and there are — a good judge respects precedent."

(Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Marijuana

While Gorsuch does hail from Colorado, the first state to legalize marijuana for recreational use, it is still unclear where he stands on the issue.

In 2015, Gorsuch ruled against a dispensary, forcing the company to pay taxes on items they wrote off as business expenses in an effort to avoid incriminating themselves due to a federal law banning marijuana. 

(Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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"If Neil Gorsuch was the first Supreme Court justice ever to be filibustered, what happened to Merrick Garland's vote?" one constituent asked.

"I think Merrick Garland was a great man and a good judge, but what happened in the Senate last year, you may not have liked it, but it was not without precedent," Flake responded, eliciting boos from the audience.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer

Spicer's comments about Adolf Hitler also dogged members of Congress at town halls in their districts. When one audience member at Coffman's town hall asked about Spicer's Hitler remarks, Coffman called for Spicer's removal.

"He needs to go," Coffman said.

Trump's tax returns

When Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.) said Trump has the right to keep his tax returns private, the room at his Thursday night town hall erupted.

"Every one of us has a protection of our tax returns," Walden said, leading to chants of "Shame! Shame!" according to a local television station.

Planned Parenthood funding

On Thursday, Trump signed a bill that allows states to defund health care clinics that provide abortion services, such as Planned Parenthood. And Republican members of congress who voted in favor of the law got hammered by angry town hall attendees over that vote.

"I'm pro-life," Flake said to a town hall attendee who said she's called and visited Flake's office to demand he keep Planned Parenthood funding.

"No matter how you feel about the abortion issue, taxpayer funding shouldn't be used to provide abortion services," Flake added, to loud boos and chants that at times drowned out his response.

Source: American Bridge 21st Century/YouTube

Congressional pay

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.) incorrectly explained to a voter that the idea of taxpayers footing the bill for his $174,000 congressional salary is "bull crap."

"I pay for myself," Mullin said. "I paid enough taxes before I ever got there and continue to through my company to pay my own salary. This is a service no one here pays me to do. I do it as an honor and a service."

Taxpayer money does, in fact, fund Mullin's salary.

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