Trump: 'Things will work out fine between the USA and Russia'

President Donald Trump tweeted reassurance Thursday morning that everything would "work out fine" with the US and Russia after he said the day before that relations between the two countries were at an all-time low.

"Things will work out fine between the U.S.A. and Russia," Trump tweeted. "At the right time everyone will come to their senses & there will be lasting peace!"

During a press conference Wednesday with NATO's secretary-general, Trump said the US "may be at an all-time low" in its relations with Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin said the same day that trust between the US and Russia had deteriorated under Trump.

RELATED: Russian forces in Syria

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Russian forces in Syria
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Russian forces in Syria
Russian soldiers walk in the Old City of Aleppo, Syria January 31, 2017. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
A Russian soldier walks to a military vehicle in goverment controlled Hanono housing district in Aleppo, Syria December 4, 2016. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers carry their weapons in the Old City of Aleppo, Syria January 31, 2017. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
Russian soldiers, on armoured vehicles, patrol a street in Aleppo, Syria February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
Men inspect the wreckage of a Russian helicopter that had been shot down in the north of Syria's rebel-held Idlib province, Syria August 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Abdullah TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Rebel fighters stand in line past Russian soldiers (back) as they wait to evacuate the besieged Waer district in the central Syrian city of Homs, after an agreement was reached between rebels and Syria's army, March 18, 2017. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers, on armored vehicles, patrol a street in Aleppo, Syria February 2, 2017. Picture taken February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
A man looks towards a Russian helicopter as it flies over ruins in the historic city of Palmyra, Syria March 4, 2017. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
A Russian soldier stands near a bus carrying people who came back to inspect their homes in government controlled Hanono housing district in Aleppo, Syria December 4, 2016. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers stand near food aid being distributed to Syrians evacuated from eastern Aleppo, in government controlled Jibreen area in Aleppo, Syria November 30, 2016. The text on the bag, showing Syrian and Russian national flags, reads in Arabic: "Russia is with you". REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers and civilians walk along a street in Aleppo, Syria January 30, 2017. Picture taken January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
A Russian soldier drives a military vehicle in Aleppo, Syria December 4, 2016. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers, on armoured vehicles, patrol a street in Aleppo, Syria February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Residents look at Russian vehicles in Aleppo, Syria December 4, 2016. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers gather as rebel fighters and their families evacuate the besieged Waer district in the central Syrian city of Homs, after an agreement reached between rebels and Syria's army, Syria March 18, 2017. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
Russian soldiers, on armoured vehicles, patrol a street in Aleppo, Syria February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki
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Tensions are heightened after a chemical-weapons attack in Syria last week that killed more than 80 people, including women and children. The US has blamed the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, a close ally of Russia, for the attack. Assad maintains that his government is not responsible, and Putin suggested earlier this week that the attack was a "false flag" designed to frame Assad.

In response to the attack, Trump last week ordered a strike on military infrastructure used by Assad's forces.

SEE ALSO: Tillerson faces off with Russia's foreign minister in tense press conference following Syria strike

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