Dancers from around the world compete at Dublin's Irish Dancing Championships

DUBLIN, April 11 (Reuters) - Dancers from around the world will stomp the floorboards and leap into the air as they show off their best moves at Dublin's World Irish Dancing Championships this week.

The April 9-16 event draws some 5,000 performers from Ireland and overseas, including from both the Irish diaspora in places like the United States and Australia as well as less likely countries such as Russia and Japan.

Contestants range in age from eight to 30, according to the organizers.

See photos from the event below:

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World Irish dancing championships
A coach advises her pupil during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers wait backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers wait backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer performs onstage during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer performs on stage during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer after having fake tan applied to her legs waits for it to dry before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Solo dancers queue up to perform on stage during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers look on backstage as a performing group have their photo taken before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer warms up backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers warm up backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer performs before a judging panel during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A competitor warms up before competing at the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers warm up before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dancer has make up applied to her eyes backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Dancers wait backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Aibhin Kenneally aged 13 from the Flynn-O'Kane dance group warms up backstage before performing during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A dance group have a team meeting before performing on stage in the under 13's category during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Emelie Wong aged 11 of the Turley Duggan dance school from Birmingham gets ready before competing at the World Irish Dancing Championships, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
A competitor performs on stage in the under 13's category during the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
Competitors leave the stage in the under 13's category after competing at the World Irish Dancing Championships in Dublin, Ireland April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
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Excitement was palpable backstage on Tuesday as performers warmed up for the championships' categories including the traditional solo step dances, figure choreography team dancing, dance drama that tells a story and ceili, a kind of Celtic square dance.

For many of the young female dancers, the day began with a 45-minute long make-up session to ensure their colorful dresses, curled wigs and rhinestone tiaras sat just right.

In the course of the week, some 25,000 spectators are expected at the event, cheering on the competitors.

(Reporting by Clodagh Kilcoyne; Writing by Marine Hass; Editing by Tom Heneghan)

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