Clinton opens up about loss to Trump and snipes at GOP for healthcare disaster

In one of her most candid speaking appearances since losing the 2016 presidential election, Hillary Clinton harshly criticized Russia for interfering with the race, and said misogyny was a factor that contributed to her loss.

"I am deeply concerned about what went on with Russia," Clinton said at the Women in the World summit in New York City on Thursday. "A foreign party meddled with our election. and did so in a way that we're learning more about every single day."

Clinton, during an interview with New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, was particularly critical of Russian President Vladimir Putin, who she described as "someone who plays the long game" and "plays three-dimensional chess."

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Hillary Clinton at the Women in the World Summit
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Hillary Clinton at the Women in the World Summit
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage with Journalist Nicholas Kristof at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appears on stage at the Women in the World Summit in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S. April 6, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets Samantha Bee at the Eighth Annual Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: (L-R) Tina Brown acknowledges former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton after an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 06: Former United States Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak during the Eighth Annual Women In The World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waves as she arrives onstage for an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 06: Former United States Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak during the Eighth Annual Women In The World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pauses during an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 6: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives onstage for an interview with Nicholas Kristof during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center, April 6, 2017 in New York City. Clinton discussed a range of issues, including the crisis in Syria. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Former US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton and Journalist Nicholas Kristof speak at the Eighth Annual Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on April 6, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / ANGELA WEISS (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
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"What was done to us was an act of aggression, and it was carried out by a foreign power under the control of someone who has a deep desire to dominate Europe and to send us into a tailspin," Clinton said.

Like many of her fellow Democrats, Clinton called on Congress to establish an independent investigation into the Russian interference. Earlier on Thursday, House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes, a Republican, recused himself from the committee's investigation after he came under fire for possible ethics violations, and some lawmakers have called into question Congress' ability to conduct a nonpartisan inquiry.

Clinton has made few public appearances since the election, but has reemerged on the political scene in the past few weeks.

On Thursday, she opened up about her stunning loss to President Donald Trump, saying misogyny "played a role" in her defeat.

She continued: "In this election, there was a very real struggle between what is viewed as change that is welcomed and exciting to so many Americans, and change that is worrisome and threatening to so many others. And you layer on the first woman president over that, and I think some people, women included, had real problems."

Clinton also revived her criticism of FBI Director James Comey, who alerted Congress 11 days before the election that he was reopening the investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server. Eight days later, Comey said he still would not recommend charges against Clinton, however his initial note to Congress is widely seen as having dissuaded some voters from choosing Clinton.

"The Comey letter coming as it did ... really raised serious questions in a lot of people that were obviously unfounded, but nevertheless happened," she said.

Clinton also weighed in on Republican efforts to overhaul American healthcare, which ended in embarrassment in March after GOP leadership couldn't muster the votes to pass the Affordable Health Care Act, a replacement for President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.

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American Health Care Act
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WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: Republican House members join U.S. President Donald Trump on stage as he speaks during a Rose Garden event May 4, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. The House has passed the American Health Care Act that will replace the Obama era� Affordable Healthcare Act with a vote of 217-213. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a Stop 'Trumpcare' rally May 4, 2017 in front of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Congressional Democrats joined activists for a rally to urge not to replace Obamacare, also known as the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) (R) greets House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (L) during a Stop 'Trumpcare' rally May 4, 2017 in front of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Congressional Democrats joined activists for a rally to urge not to replace Obamacare, also known as the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump shares a moment with Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) during a Rose Garden event May 4, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. The House has passed the American Health Care Act that will replace the Obama era� Affordable Healthcare Act with a vote of 217-213. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: U.S. House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (L) gestures as Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) wait for their turns to speak during a Stop 'Trumpcare' rally May 4, 2017 in front of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Congressional Democrats joined activists for a rally to urge not to replace Obamacare, also known as the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 4: Charlie Wood, 4, of Charlottesville, Va., plays with bubbles during rally on the East Front lawn of the Capitol to oppose the House Republicans' bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on May 4, 2017. She was born 3 1/2 months earlier and her mother Rebecca, at left, holding a picture of Charlie in the hospital, fears changes to the ACA will negatively effect her care. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House following the House of Representative vote on the health care bill on May 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Following weeks of in-party feuding and mounting pressure from the White House, lawmakers voted 217 to 213 to pass a bill dismantling much of Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and allowing US states to opt out of many of the law's key health benefit guarantees / AFP PHOTO / Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner listen to US President Donald Trump speak in the Rose Garden of the White House following the House of Representative vote on the health care bill on May 4, 2017 in Washington, D Following weeks of in-party feuding and mounting pressure from the White House, lawmakers voted 217 to 213 to pass a bill dismantling much of Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and allowing US states to opt out of many of the law's key health benefit guarantees / AFP PHOTO / Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 9: Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a presentation in the House studio of the American Health Care Act, the GOP's plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, March 9, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price compares a copy of the Affordable Care Act (R) and a copy of the new House Republican health care bill (L) during the White House daily press briefing March 7, 2017 at the White House in Washington, DC. Secretary Price answered questions on the new healthcare bill during the briefing. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 13: U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (L) and Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney talk to reporters following the release of the Congressional Budget Office report on the proposed American Health Care Act outside the White House West Wing March 13, 2017 in Washington, DC. Price said 'We disagree strenuously' with the findings of the CBO report about the Republican's attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks at a news conference about Congressional efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 9, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 10: U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (4th L) delivers remarks at the beginning of a meeting with representatives of conservative political organizations to discuss the American Health Care Act in the Indian Treaty Room in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building March 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price led the meeting that included representatives from the Cato Institute, Tea Party Patriots, the American Conservative Union, Freedom Works, the American Legislative Exchange Council and other conservative groups. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 10: (L-R) U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump greet House of Representatives committee leaders (L-R) House Budget Committee Chairwoman Diane Black (R-TN), Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden (R-WA) and Education and Workforce Committee Chairwoman Virginia Foxx (R-NC) before a meeting to discuss the American Health Care Act in the Roosevelt Room at the White House March 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. The proposed legislation is the Republican attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks to the media about the American Health Care Act at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S. March 15, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks about efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare and the advancement of the American Health Care Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
A copy of Obamacare repeal and replace recommendations (L) produced by Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives sit next to a copy of the Affordable Care Act known as Obamacare as U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price addresses the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
(L-R) U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan, U.S. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and U.S. Representative Greg Walden hold a news conference on the American Health Care Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 7, 2017. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
UNITED STATES - MARCH 14: House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., attend a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to voice opposition to House Republican's health care plan, the American Health Care Act, March 14, 2017. The event featured testimony from patients and doctors who benefit from the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 14: From left, Dr. Alice T. Chen, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Maggie Hassn, D-N.H., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., attend a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center to voice opposition to House Republican's health care plan, the American Health Care Act, March 14, 2017. The event featured testimony from patients and doctors who benefit from the Affordable Care Act. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan speaks at a news conference about Congressional efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. March 9, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 08: House Energy and Commerce Committee staff members work during a markup hearing on the proposed American Health Care Act, the Republican attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare, in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill March 8, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans were rushing the legislation through the powerful Energy and Commerce, and Ways and Means committees, aiming for a full House vote next week. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) (R) and House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) (L) arrive for a news conference on the newly announced American Health Care Act at the U.S. Capitol March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans yesterday released details on their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, with a more conservative agenda that includes individual tax credits and grants for states replacing federal insurance subsidies. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer (L) looks on as US Secretary of Health and Human Service Tom Price (R) points to a print-out of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and a copy of the new plan introduced to repeal and replace the ACA during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC on March 7, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 07: House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) (L) and House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) (R) answer questions during a news conference on the newly announced American Health Care Act at the U.S. Capitol March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. House Republicans yesterday released details on their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, with a more conservative agenda that includes individual tax credits and grants for states replacing federal insurance subsidies. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 4: Protesters yell 'shame'' to members of Congress on the East Front of the Capitol after the House passed the Republicans' bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on May 4, 2017. The protesters support the ACA. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 04: U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a Stop 'Trumpcare' rally May 4, 2017 in front of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Congressional Democrats joined activists for a rally to urge not to replace Obamacare, also known as the Affordable Care Act. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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"I will admit that was somewhat gratifying," she said, eliciting applause from the audience.

Despite waging war on Obama's healthcare act, better known as Obamacare, few Republican lawmakers were actually familiar with what it entailed, Clinton said.

"I don't know that any of them had read the bill, read the law, understood how it worked. It was so obvious," Clinton said. "And health care is complicated right?" she added, referencing a tweet from Trump.

Clinton soon waded back into foreign policy, demanding payback for the chemical attack that claimed at least 70 lives in Syria on Tuesday. While Trump has remained vague on his stance toward Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad, Clinton called for a swift response to the attack.

"It is important we take a strong stance against chemical weapons," Clinton said.

"People have to know that they will be held accountable as war criminals, as committing crimes against humanity, if they engage in these kinds of aggressive, violent acts."

When asked whether she would run for office again, Clinton said she "likely" will not, focusing instead on helping Democrats regain a majority in Congress.

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