Report: Jerry Jones calls for end to NFL weed ban

During a closed-door NFL owner's meeting, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones reportedly had a great many takes about the future of the league: namely that players should be free to use marijuana and the NFL should conduct fewer investigations of domestic violence allegations.

A source with direct knowledge of the meeting told NBC's Pro Football Talk blog about Jones's suggestions for improving the health of the league. There are obviously selfless proposals that definitely have nothing to do with the numerous Cowboys players busted in recent years for either failing banned substance tests or committing violent acts against women.

Last November, Cowboys defensive end Randy Gregory tested positive for marijuana while serving a suspension for previous violations of the NFL's banned substance policy. Gregory has more failed drug tests (six) than total sacks (one) in his two-year career. Gregory is one of three Cowboys that have run afoul of league substance abuse policy, and one of two to get caught using a recreational drug—linebacker Rolando McClain tested positive for "purple drank," a cocktail of cough syrup, codeine, and Sprite. These pesky drug suspensions are getting in the way of Jerry's team winning a playoff game for the first time since the Cowboys didn't receive a reflexive eye roll whenever someone referred to them as "America's Team."

According to the source, Jones had to be reminded during the meeting that he can't autonomously decree an end to testing for weed because it falls under NFL's banned substance under the collective bargaining agreement. He'll have to go through the bureaucracy of asking the players what they think.

The Cowboys' repeated accusations of domestic violence make the repeated drug controversies comparatively tame. Two recent Cowboys stars, Ezekiel Elliott and Greg Hardy, have been at the forefront of the NFL's public issues with domestic violence. Elliott, their Pro Bowl rookie running back, is currently under investigation over an assault allegation from his former girlfriend. The woman, who has identified herself as Tiffany Thompson, has accused Elliott of assaulting her on five separate occasions and has posted bruises of her alleged assault to her Instagram account. Hardy, a former defensive end, was arrested in 2014 for assaulting a former girlfriend, who, like Thompson, posted graphic photos documenting the alleged abuse. Hardy maintains his innocence. He's currently a free agent that, last we heard, is training for a MMA career.

More on Greg Hardy

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Greg Hardy
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DE Greg Hardy among #Panthers inactives for home opener vs. Detroit: http://t.co/C2rK4Tbj3X
CHARLOTTE, NC - AUGUST 08: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers watches from the bench during the fourth quarter of a loss to the Buffalo Bills at Bank of America Stadium on August 8, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Buffalo won 20-18. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy walks into the Mecklenburg County Courthouse on Tuesday, July 15, 2014 in Charlotte, N.C. Hardy is scheduled to be in court to face charges that he beat up his ex-girlfriend during an altercation at his residence in May. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy walks into the Mecklenburg County Courthouse on Tuesday, July 15, 2014 in Charlotte, N.C. Hardy is scheduled to be in court to face charges that he beat up his ex-girlfriend during an altercation at his residence in May. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - JANUARY 12: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers runs onto the field during player introductions against the San Francisco 49ers during the NFC Divisional Playoff Game at Bank of America Stadium on January 12, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - DECEMBER 15: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers against the New York Jets during play at Bank of America Stadium on December 15, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Panthers won 30-20. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - DECEMBER 15: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers against the New York Jets during play at Bank of America Stadium on December 15, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Panthers won 30-20. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
PITTSBURGH, PA - AUGUST 28: Defensive lineman Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers looks on from the sideline during a preseason game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Heinz Field on August 28, 2014 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Panthers defeated the Steelers 10-0. (Photo by George Gojkovich/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - DECEMBER 22: CHARLOTTE, NC - DECEMBER Drew Brees #9 of the New Orleans Saints is sacked by Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers at Bank of America Stadium on December 22, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - JANUARY 12: Frank Gore #21 of the San Francisco 49ers is tackled by Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers in the fourth quarter during the NFC Divisional Playoff Game at Bank of America Stadium on January 12, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - NOVEMBER 18: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers celebrates after a play against the New England Patriots at Bank of America Stadium on November 18, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
Greg Hardy (76) of the Carolina Panthers sacks Tom Brady (12) of the New England Patriots during first-quarter action at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, N.C., on Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - SEPTEMBER 22: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers during their game at Bank of America Stadium on September 22, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy (76) and St. Louis Rams guard Harvey Dahl (62) get into a skirmish during fourth-quarter action at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina on Sunday, October 20, 2013. Panthers won, 30-15. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - AUGUST 09: Greg Hardy #76 of the Carolina Panthers against the Chicago Bears during a preseason NFL game at Bank of America Stadium on August 9, 2013 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Panthers won 24-17. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
The Carolina Panthers' Greg Hardy, right, pressures Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles into an interception during the first half in preseason action at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Thursday, August 15, 2013. (David T. Foster III/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Dallas Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy laughs with a young fan as the team signs autographs for military members and families after Cowboys' arrival at Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu for training camp in Oxnard, Calif., on Tuesday, July 28, 2015. (Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 11: Defensive end Greg Hardy #76 of the Dallas Cowboys on the sidelines before a game against the New England Patriots at AT&T Stadium on October 11, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Jones adamantly defended both of his players saying hebelieves there is "absolutely nothing" to the allegations, while Elliot insists that he's a "target."

If you squint your eyes past the self-interest of Jones' recommendations, there are obvious criticisms about how the NFL handles drug use and domestic violence. A league facing a class-action suit by their former players for illegally administering unsafe amounts of painkillers while denying its players access to medicinal cannabis just doesn't add up.

Plus, the NFL's recent emphasis on conducting independent domestic violence investigations and doling out punishments as Diana Moskovitz argues, may, in fact, put their victims at greater risk of continued abuse and as such, do little to dispel cynicism that their tough-on-crime attitude is more than a glorified PR move.

As it is, both of Jones's recommendations are unlikely in the near-term.

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Marijuana legalization laws by state
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Marijuana legalization laws by state

Alabama: Medical use only, otherwise possession is a felony

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Alaska: Marijuana legalized for medical and recreational use 

(Photo: Zoonar/N.Okhitin via Getty Images)

Arizona: Marijuana legalized for medical use

(Photo: Mikel Ortega via Getty Images)

Arkansas: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

California: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Getty)

Colorado: Legal for medical and recreational use  

(REUTERS/Rick Wilking)

Connecticut: Decriminalized and legalized for medical use 

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Delaware: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Florida: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Georgia: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Hawaii: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Idaho: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Illinois: Decriminalized

(Photo: VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm)

Indiana: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Iowa: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Kansas: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Kentucky: Not legal

(Photo: Dorling Kindersley via Getty Images)

Louisiana: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Maine: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Maryland: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Massachusetts: Legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Michigan: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Minnesota: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

Mississippi: Decriminalized on first offense

(Photo: Getty Images)

Missouri: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Montana: Medical use only

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Nebraska: Decriminalized on first offense only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Nevada: Legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

New Hampshire: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

New Jersey: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

New Mexico: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

New York: Decriminalized unless in public view

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

North Carolina: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

North Dakota: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Ohio: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Oklahoma: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Oregon: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Pennsylvania: Medical use only

(Photo: Henryk Sadura via Getty Images)

Rhode Island: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

South Carolina: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

South Dakota: Not legal

(Photo: Dave and Les Jacobs via Getty Images)

Tennessee: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Texas: Medical use only, decriminalized in Houston and Dallas

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Utah: Not legal 

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Vermont: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Virginia: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Washington: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Photo: Shutterstock)

West Virginia: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wisconsin: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wyoming: Not legal 

(Photo: Space Images via Getty Images)

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The post Report: Jerry Jones Calls For End To NFL Weed Ban appeared first on Vocativ.

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