Poll: Democrats lose pride in America

Democrats' harsh appraisal of Republican President Donald Trump is eroding their pride in the country as a whole, according to the latest Gallup poll.

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats are "extremely" or "very" proud to be Americans – down from 78 percent a year ago.

In contrast, 92 percent of Republicans and 73 percent of independents are as likely now as in 2016 to be proud of their country, the survey found.

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Tim Kaine, 2016 Democratic vice presidential nominee, speaks during an event conducted entirely in Spanish, a first for an organized presidential campaign event, in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016. Five days from the U.S. presidential election, polls released Thursday showed the race narrowing, with Democrat Hillary Clinton holding on to a slim lead over Republican Donald Trump. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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The previous low of 74 percent of Democrats who were proud of their country was in January 2007 amid reverses in the Iraq war and very low job approval ratings for Republican President George W. Bush.

"The decline in Democratic pride this year most likely stems from Democrats' negative feelings about President Donald Trump; fewer than 10 percent of Democrats approve of the job Trump is doing," said Gallup spokesman Jeffrey Jones in an analysis of the poll.

SEE ALSO: Poll: Trump's job approval rating again sinks below 40 percent

"The current 25-point gap in patriotic feelings between Republicans and Democrats is the highest in Gallup's records," Jones added. "In January 2007, the party gap was 21 points."

The drop in Democratic pride caused the percentage of Americans overall who are extremely proud or very proud of their country to fall to a new low of 75 percent, down from the previous low of 81 percent in 2016. The high points in pride came in the years after the terrorist attacks of 9/11 when more than nine in 10 Americans were very or extremely proud of their country.

Copyright 2017 U.S. News & World Report

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