ISIS spokesman says the US is 'being run by an idiot' in first statement on Trump

The terrorist group ISIS has finally spoken out about US President Donald Trump.

ISIS spokesman Abu al-Hassan al-Muhajer said in an audio recording released Tuesday on the encrypted messaging app Telegram that the US is "bankrupt" and "being run by an idiot," according to Reuters.

Muhajer also told Americans: "The signs of your demise are evident to every eye."

"There is no more evidence than [that] you being run by an idiot who does not know what Syria or Iraq or Islam is," Muhajer said in the statement.

ISIS leadership has not previously addressed Trump.

18 PHOTOS
Inside the luxury Mosul hotel that housed ISIS elite -- Ninewah Oberoi Hotel
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Inside the luxury Mosul hotel that housed ISIS elite -- Ninewah Oberoi Hotel

General view of the damaged five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel damaged in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

An Iraqi soldier walks in the damaged room in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

An Iraqi soldier holds his weapon while looking over a balcony between the damaged floors in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

A damaged bathtub in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

General view from inside shows the damage to the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

The entrance of the health club in the damaged five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

An Iraqi Soldier wears slippers of the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

An Iraqi soldier stands in a damaged room in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

Iraqi soldiers walk along the damaged floors in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

Iraqi soldiers look out from a damaged room in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

An Iraqi soldier looks at the damages in one of the rooms in the five-star Ninewah Oberoi Hotel in Mosul city, Mosul, Iraq January 30, 2017.  

(REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

Iraqi forces stand guard outside the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists on January 21, 2017. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

Members of the Iraqi forces pose for a picture with a V-gesture outside the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists on January 21, 2017. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

TOPSHOT - A member of the Iraqi forces stands guard inside a room in the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists on January 21, 2017. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

Members of the Iraqi counter-terrorism service (CTS) take position inside a room in the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

A picture taken on January 21, 2017 shows the view from a window outside the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

Members of the Iraqi counter-terrorism service (CTS) take position inside a room in the Oberoi hotel in the city of Mosul after government forces retook control of the area from the Islamic State group (IS), during the ongoing military operation against the jihadists on January 21, 2017. Iraqi forces battled the last holdout jihadists in east Mosul after commanders declared victory there and quickly set their sights on the city's west, where more tough fighting awaits.

(AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)

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But its supporters seemed to cheer a Trump presidency — last year Foreign Affairs magazine analyzed ISIS' online channels and interviewed a dozen supporters and defectors who said Trump would "lead the United States on a path to self-destruction."

Then earlier this year, ISIS members reportedly branded Trump's executive order on immigration "the Blessed Ban" as it seemingly proved that the West is at war with Islam.

Malcolm Nance, a terrorism expert and veteran military-intelligence officer, told Business Insider last year that Trump was "ISIS' preferred candidate" because he's "unstable."

It's not uncommon for ISIS to target the president of the United States in its propaganda messaging.

ISIS experts pointed out before the election that the terrorist group actually talked about President Barack Obama more than Trump.

In its statement, ISIS also sought to assert its strength and encourage followers to keep fighting.

"This is about convincing would-be terrorists of the group's strength, durability and thus worthiness of support," Michael S. Smith II, a terrorism analyst who studies ISIS propaganda, told Business Insider. "For those willing to drink that toxic cocktail, this all translates to an incredibly effective framework for inciting violence that entails the use of an authoritative figure — a caliph — and his proxies like al-Muhajir to command violence globally."

NOW WATCH: Watch Trump walk out of an executive-order signing ceremony without signing any orders

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