A doomsday vault exists to ease all your apocalypse fears

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By: Angeli Kakade, Buzz60

When preparing for Doomsday, most people stock up on canned goods, but the 1% buys tickets to go live in outer-space.

This country is planning for Armageddon with a gigantic vault on an island in the middle of the Arctic Ocean.

Svalbard, Norway, is home to the vault which opened this week with the mission of housing the world's archives if or when the world ends.

It's also not the first Doomsday Vault in the region. The first vault was opened to house seeds if a country's crop's were cropped out of existence.

Photos of the seed vault:

8 PHOTOS
Svalbard Global Seed Vault
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Svalbard Global Seed Vault
A general view of the entrance of the international gene bank Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV), outside Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen, Norway, on February 29, 2016. / AFP / NTB Scanpix / Junge, Heiko / Norway OUT (Photo credit should read JUNGE, HEIKO/AFP/Getty Images)
Journalists and cameramen walk under a gust of cold wind near the entrance of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault that was officially opened near Longyearbyen on February 26, 2008. A vault carved into the Arctic permafrost and filled with samples of the world's most important seeds was inaugurated Tuesday, providing a Noah's Ark of food crops in the event of a global catastrophe. AFP PHOTO SCANPIX / Hakon Mosvold Larsen - NORWAY OUT (Photo credit should read Larsen, Hakon Mosvold/AFP/Getty Images)
Entrance to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, largest seed bank in the world near Longyearbyen on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen. (Photo by: Arterra/UIG via Getty Images)
A man acrries one of the newly arrived boxes containing seeds from Japan and USA into the international gene bank Svalbard Global Seed Vault (SGSV), outside Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen, Norway, on March 1, 2016. / AFP / NTB Scanpix / Junge, Heiko / Norway OUT (Photo credit should read JUNGE, HEIKO/AFP/Getty Images)
This photo taken on September 2, 2009 in Longyearbyen, Norway, shows a vault carved into the Arctic permafrost filled with samples of the world's most important seeds in case food crops are wiped out by a catastrophe. UN chief Ban Ki-moon toured the facility today, as he urged world leaders to act now to halt global warming. Aimed at safeguarding biodiversity in the face of climate change, wars and other natural and man-made disasters, the seed bank has the capacity to hold up to 4.5 million batches of seeds, or twice the number of crop varieties believed to exist in the world today. AFP PHOTO/Jacqueline Pietsch (Photo credit should read JACQUELINE PIETSCH/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers carry boxes of seeds into the Svalbard Global Seed Vault after its official opening on February 26, 2008 in Longyearbyen. The Global Seed Vault has been built in a mountainside cavern on the island of Svalbard, around 1000 km from the North Pole, to store the world's crop seeds in case of a disaster. AFP PHOTO / DANIEL SANNUM LAUTEN (Photo credit should read DANIEL SANNUM LAUTEN/AFP/Getty Images)
This photo taken on September 2, 2009 in Longyearbyen, Norway, shows a vault carved into the Arctic permafrost filled with samples of the world's most important seeds in case food crops are wiped out by a catastrophe. UN chief Ban Ki-moon toured the facility today, as he urged world leaders to act now to halt global warming. Aimed at safeguarding biodiversity in the face of climate change, wars and other natural and man-made disasters, the seed bank has the capacity to hold up to 4.5 million batches of seeds, or twice the number of crop varieties believed to exist in the world today. AFP PHOTO/Jacqueline Pietsch (Photo credit should read JACQUELINE PIETSCH/AFP/Getty Images)
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The new vault uses a special film developed by the firm Piql. The film has been used in Hollywood and is designed to withstand a lot of wear and tear.

The Network NRK reported the team has conducted experiments to test how long the film can last for. So far it's 500 years, but they're testing to see if they can get that number up to 1,000.

Why Norway? Thanks to to the Svalbard Treaty, no military action can take place there which ensures a relatively safe life for anything inside the vault.

So far Mexico and Brazil are the only countries to be using the vault's services, but the team opened the vault this week with champagne in hand to celebrate.

Let's just hope whoever's in charge of the code had only one glass.

RELATED: See how families across America are preparing for the apocalypse:

19 PHOTOS
How families across America are preparing for the apocalypse
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How families across America are preparing for the apocalypse
Jeff Nice empties his boot of dried corn at his farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
Jeff Nice repairs a tractor disk at his farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
A pen rests on a notepad with a list of chores at the Nice family farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
Jeanie Nice trims excess meat off a cooked chicken to be used in soup in her kitchen in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
Jeff Nice tends to his honey bees on his farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
Chickens are seen in one of two freezers at the Nice family farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
Jeanie Nice and her husband Jeff Nice carry parts for a shelving unit into their barn on their farm in Kinston, North Carolina December 14, 2012. Preppers Jeff and Jeanie Nice live on a 13 acre farm where they raise beef, chicken, turkey and can vegetables from their garden. After completion of a government contact working in computers Jeff has spent most of his time on the farm tending to the livestock and general chores such as planting grass or keeping his equipment in working order. On the farm is a 200 yard rifle range where Jeff teaches hunter education and gun safety. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
Phil Burns pulls a gun from his backpack full of survival supplies at his home in American Fork, Utah, December 14, 2012. While most "preppers" discount the Mayan calendar prophecy, many are preparing to be self-sufficient for threats like nuclear war, natural disaster, famine and economic collapse. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
Phil Burns, a firearms instructor, holds a handgun that he carries as part of his survival supplies at his home in American Fork, Utah, December 14, 2012. While most "preppers" discount the Mayan calendar prophecy many are preparing to be self-sufficient for threats like nuclear war, natural disaster, famine and economic collapse. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
Phil Burns demonstrates the air purifying SCape Mask at his home in American Fork, Utah, December 14, 2012. While most "preppers" discount the Mayan calendar prophecy, many are preparing to be self-sufficient for threats like nuclear war, natural disaster, famine and economic collapse. Picture taken December 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
Hugh Vail inventories his food storage at his home in Bountiful, Utah, December 10, 2012. While most "preppers" discount the Mayan calendar prophecy, many are preparing to be self-sufficient for threats like nuclear war, natural disaster, famine and economic collapse. Picture taken December 10, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD)
Hugh Vail cuts firewood at his home in Bountiful, Utah, December 10, 2012. While most "preppers" discount the Mayan calendar prophecy, many are preparing to be self-sufficient for threats like nuclear war, natural disaster, famine and economic collapse. Picture taken December 10, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
Mike Holland looks over as a chicken is run through the plucker after being slaughtered at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power. Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
James Grant cuts a chicken's neck as he helps in the slaughter at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power.Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
Mike Holland reviews his stock of dry food storage in a trailer at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power. Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES)
Noah Holland reads a book in the living room of his family's home at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power. Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY)
James Blair cleans chickens at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power. Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS FOOD)
A knife is covered with blood and a few feathers while it is used to slaughter chickens at the Holland family property in Warrenton, North Carolina December 13, 2012. Prepper Mike Holland lives with his wife, four children and three other men on their 13 acre property where they raise, chickens, turkey, goat and a cow for milk. In addition to livestock they also have a greenhouse and a few trailers that house food storage including multiple freezers. Outside of food preparations Holland has ammunition and firearms, a safe room, security cameras and a military grade generator for power. Picture taken December 13, 2012. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
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