Clinton warns Trump's proposed budget cuts would endanger US security

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Hillary Clinton on Friday warned that the deep budget cuts to foreign aid and diplomacy proposed by President Donald Trump to fund increased military spending would make the United States, and the world, less safe.

"We are seeing signals of a shift that should alarm us all, this administration's proposed budget cuts to international health, development and diplomacy would be a blow to women and children and a grave mistake," Clinton said during a speech at Georgetown University.

The Trump administration has asked Congress for a 28 percent, or $10.9 billion, cut in U.S. State Department funding and other international programs to help pay for a 10 percent, $54 billion hike in military spending next year.

RELATED: Trump meets with other world leaders

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President Trump meeting other world leaders
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President Trump meeting other world leaders
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) is greeted by greets U.S. President Donald Trump in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 13, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump pose for a photograph before attending dinner at Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., February 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump looks down at a bust of former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill while meeting with British Prime Minister Theresa May at the White House in Washington, U.S., January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses a joint news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump (R) at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, left, speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump, during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, March 17, 2017. Merkel, who is running for a fourth term in Germanys election in September, plans to explain her view of the mutual advantages of free trade during her talks with Trump on Friday, according to German officials. Photographers: Pat Benic/Pool via Bloomberg
King Abdullah II of Jordan, left, looks towards U.S. President Donald Trump after shaking hands during a news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, April 5, 2017. The talks with the Jordanian monarch are expected to focus on other regional issues, including Syria and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, Egypt's president, during a meeting inside the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, April 3, 2017. Trump�said Monday his buildup of the U.S. military would help El-Sisi�fight terrorism as the two met at the White House for their first summit of the Trump presidency. Photographer: Olivier Douliery/Pool via Bloomberg
US President Donald Trump meets with Iraqi Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi in the Oval Office in the White House on March 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / MOLLY RILEY (Photo credit should read MOLLY RILEY/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (L) and Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) walk together at the Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach, Florida, April 7, 2017. President Donald Trump entered a second day of talks with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping on Friday hoping to strike deals on trade and jobs after an overnight show of strength in Syria. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump meets Prime Minister Lokke Rasmussen of Denmark outside the West Wing of the White House March 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump is hosting Prime Minister Rasmussen with an Oval Office meeting. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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The White House has shrugged off concerns from Democrats, some Republicans and current and former national security leaders about the impact, saying the proposed cuts are Trump making good on promises he made during his presidential race against Clinton, the Democratic nominee.

Clinton, also the State Department's top diplomat during the Obama administration, was speaking at the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, which presents an annual award in Clinton's name to women who have advocated for peaceful solutions.

"Advancing the rights and full participation of women and girls is the great unfinished business of the 21st century," said Clinton, the first woman to be nominated for president by a major U.S. party.

"It's not only the right and moral goal for us to be pursuing ... this is strategic and necessary for matters of peace, prosperity and security."

Clinton garnered some of the most enthusiastic applause from the university students in attendance when she took a subtle jab at her former presidential rival.

Shortly after Clinton praised the institute for making an "evidence-based case" for promoting women's roles, she stopped to remark: "Here I go again, talking about research, evidence, and facts."

Clinton said during her contentious race against Trump that he was "an absolute avalanche of falsehoods."

One of Trump's top advisers said the administration used "alternative facts" after a public disagreement over inaugural attendance.

(Reporting By Amanda Becker; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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