Booming bike-share programs create a sea of battered bikes

As countries become more eco-conscious, many people are turning to bikes as a way to cut down on traffic and emissions. Companies quickly cashed in on the bike-sharing bandwagon, especially in China.

Once known as the 'kingdom of bicycles,' China used to revere owning a bike as an achievement until cars became status symbols and bikes were given the cold shoulder to the point where bike riders were often mocked for it's 'backwardness.'

Currently, the bike revival is so strong that bicycle manufacturers are producing over a million bikes a month to keep up with the demand. With an estimated 50 million bike-share users at the end of this year, one has to wonder, where do all these bikes go when they're rendered useless?

See the mountains of bike scraps below:

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Beijing's bike waste
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. wheels a fixed bicycle past thousands of damaged bicycles in need of repair that were pulled off the streets where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. �The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'�. �In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.�The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. �Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. stands amongst a pile of thousands of damaged bicycles in need of repair that were pulled off the streets where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese worker from the bike share company Ofo Inc. unloads bicycles collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese mechanic from the bike share company Ofo Inc. chooses a bike to repair as he stands on a pile of bicycles after they were collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese worker from the bike share company Ofo Inc. transports bicycles collected from the streets to a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: The tools of a Chinese worker from the bike share company Ofo Inc. are seen at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: Chinese mechanics from the bike share company Ofo Inc. work on bicycles after they were collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese woman rides with a child on a scooter past piles of damaged bicycles pulled off the streets by bike share company Ofo Inc. at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese worker from bike share company Ofo Inc. brings damaged bicycles collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: Two Chinese women ride bike share bicycles past piles of thousands of damaged bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. that were collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. fixes bicycles that were pulled off the streets where they are kept with thousands of other ones at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese worker from bike share company Ofo Inc. throws a bicycle on top of others where thousands of damaged bicycles pulled off the streets are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. patches an inner tube at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped.  The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'�. �In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.�The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research.  Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. stands amongst a pile of thousands of damaged bicycles in need of repair that were pulled off the streets where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped.  The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'�. �In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.�The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research.  Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. leans over a pile of thousands of damaged bicycles that were pulled off the streets where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. selects a bike to fix from a pile of thousands of damaged bicycles that were pulled off the streets where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese worker from bike share company Ofo Inc. throws a bicycle on top of others where thousands of damaged bicycles pulled off the streets are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped.  The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the �ingdom of Bicycles�  In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country� economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.  The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research.  Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: Damaged bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. are seen after they were collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic works amongst damaged bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. as they are piled up at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: Damaged bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. are seen after they were collected from the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: A Chinese mechanic from bike share company Ofo Inc. is seen next to damaged bicycles pulled off the streets at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China. The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour. Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned. Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'. In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement. When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness. The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 29: Chinese workers walk past a row of repaired bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. at a repair depot for the company on March 29, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped.  The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'�. �In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.�The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research.  Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - MARCH 30: Damaged bicycles from the bike share company Ofo Inc. that were pulled off the streets are seen piled up where they are kept at a repair depot for the company on March 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. The popularity of bike shares has exploded in the past year with more than two dozen providers now battling for market share in major cities across China.  The bikes are hailed as an efficient, cheap, and environmentally-friendly solution for commuters, where riders unlock the stationless bicycles using a mobile phone app, drop them anywhere for the next user, and spend as little as 1 yuan ($0.15) per hour.  Given the bikes have several users a day - some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic - they are often damaged, vandalized, or abandoned.  Companies like Ofo routinely collect the battered two-wheelers and bring them to a makeshift depot that is part repair shop, part graveyard where they are either salvaged or scrapped. �The bike shares are powering a cycling revival of sorts in a country once known as the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'�. �In the early years of Communist China, most Chinese aspired to own a bicycle as a marker of achievement.  When the country's economic transformation made cars a more valued status symbol, the bicycle - a Chinese cultural icon - was mocked as a sign of backwardness.�The bike share craze is also a boon for manufacturers who are now mass producing over a million bikes a month to meet demand, and the number of shared bike users will reach 50 million in China by the end of the year, according to Beijing-based BigData Research. �Not everyone is cheering the revival though, as municipal officials are drafting new regulations to control the chaotic flood of bicycles on streets and sidewalks.  (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)
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Manufacturers aren't the only ones benefiting from the bike boom. Companies like Ofo are making a profit off of the cleanup. From inexperienced riders to vandalism and damages, Ofo rounds up discarded bikes and transports them to the island of misfit bikes: their repair shop. Once the damaged goods have arrived they are either stripped for parts or restored. While there may be fewer cars on the road, the piles of unusable bike parts seem as though they will rear their ugly heads in the future.

With a change in transportation, a revamp of regulations is usually not so far behind. Some residents aren't too happy with their streets and sidewalks being swarmed with bicycles and are looking for China to provide some order to the unruly riders. Prices are currently set at 1 yuan ($.15) an hour. With that price, we don't see the bike craze screeching to a halt anytime soon.

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