Trump administration cuts proposed LGBTQ questions from 2020 Census

There will not be questions concerning sexual orientation on the 2020 U.S. Census.

On Tuesday, the Census Bureau released questions they plan to ask in around three years. Soon after, reports surfaced that proposed questions about LGBTQ people have been cut.

The National LGBTQ Task Force released this graphic displaying the difference between the originally planned questions released and the modified plan released March 28:

Credit: National LGBTQ Task Force

According to LGBTQ source, Washington Blade, the U.S. Census and American Community Survey have never included questions about the LGBTQ community.

"Our goal is a complete and accurate census," Census Bureau Director John H. Thompson said in a released statement. "In planning for the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau has focused on improving its address list by using imagery, finding ways to increase household self-response, leveraging resources inside and outside the government, and making it easier and more efficient for census takers to complete their work. Furthermore, for the first time ever, the decennial will offer an online response option with the ultimate goal of improving question design and data quality while addressing community concerns."

See the safest cities for LGBTQ people

26 PHOTOS
The safest cities in America for LGBTQ
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The safest cities in America for LGBTQ

Arizona

Cities:  Phoenix, Tempe, Tuscon

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

California

Cities:  Cathedral City, Guerneville (Sonoma County), Long Beach, Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, West Hollywood

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Connecticut 

City:  Stamford

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Florida 

Cities:  Orlando, St. Petersburg, Wilton Manors

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Georgia

City:  Atlanta

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Illinois 

City: Chicago 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Indiana 

City: Bloomington 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Iowa

Cities: Ceder Rapids, Davenport, Iowa City

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Kentucky 

City: Louiseville

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Maryland

City: Baltimore

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Massachusetts

Cities: Boston, Cambridge, Provincetown, Salem, Worcester

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Michigan

Cities:  Ann Arbor, Detroit, East Lansing

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Minnesota

Cities:  Minneapolis, Saint Paul

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Missouri 

Cities:  Kansas City, St. Louis

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Montana 

City:  Missoula

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Nevada 

Cities:  Enterprise, Las Vegas, Paradise

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

New Jersey

City:  Jersey City 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

New York 

Cities: Albany, New York, Rochester, Yonkers

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Ohio

Cities: Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Oregon

City: Portland 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Pennsylvania 

City: Philadelphia 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Rhode Island 

City: Providence 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Texas

Cities:  Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Washington 

Cities:  Bellevue, Olympia, Seattle

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

Wisconsin 

City:  Madison 

Photo Credit: Getty 

Source: HRC

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In a statement provided by the Washington Blade, though, the Bureau said the LGBTQ questions should not have been included: "The Subjects Planned for the 2020 Census and American Community Survey report released today inadvertently listed sexual orientation and gender identity as a proposed topic in the appendix," it said. "The report has been corrected."

The decision has received backlash from the LGBTQ community. The Task Force released a breaking statement regarding the Census. "Today, the Trump Administration has taken yet another step to deny LGBTQ people freedom, justice, and equity, by choosing to exclude us from the 2020 Census and American Community Survey," said Meghan Maury, Criminal and Economic Justice Project Director, National LGBTQ Task Force, in the statement.

"LGBTQ people are not counted on the Census -- no data is collected on sexual orientation or gender identity. Information from these surveys helps the government to enforce federal laws like the Violence Against Women Act and the Fair Housing Act and to determine how to allocate resources like housing supports and food stamps," she continued. "If the government doesn't know how many LGBTQ people live in a community, how can it do its job to ensure we're getting fair and adequate access to the rights, protections and services we need?"

Check out previous White House celebrations of the community

11 PHOTOS
Love wins: LGBT celebrations at the White House
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Love wins: LGBT celebrations at the White House

Rainbow colored lights shine on the White House to celebrate todays US Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex marriage June 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. Today the high court ruled 5-4 that the Constitution guarantees a right to same-sex marriage in all 50 states.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A woman uses a smartphone to take a photo of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26. 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Gay marriage supporters carried balloons that spelled the words 'Love Wins' in front of the White House tonight.The White House was lit in multi-colored lights tonight to honor the Supreme Court decision to allow gay marriage.

(Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

The White House stands illuminated in rainbow colored light at dusk in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, June 26, 2015. The Supreme Court's ruling that gay marriage is legal nationwide is a 'victory for America,' U.S. President Barack Obama said today, declaring that justice had arrived for same-sex couples with 'a thunderbolt.'

(Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

People take photos of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26. 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Gay activists hold signs in front of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26. 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold balloon letters reading 'Love wins' in front of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26, 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

A gay couple hold each other as they look on at the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26. 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

A gay activist talks on the phone on front of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26. 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

People hold balloon letters reading 'Love wins' in front of the White House lightened in the rainbow colors in Washington on June 26, 2015. The US Supreme Court ruled Friday that gay marriage is a nationwide right, a landmark decision in one of the most keenly awaited announcements in decades and sparking scenes of jubilation.

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)

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Maury and The Task Force call on the president to reverse the decision and collect data on sexual orientation and transgender people. Activists such as transgender woman and actress Laverne Cox spoke out on social media:

A Twitter hashtag, #CantEraseUs, started on Tuesday to urge the Trump administration to collect the data as well.

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