Reuters/Ipsos poll: Republicans mostly blame Congress for healthcare reform failure

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

NEW YORK, March 29 (Reuters) - Republicans mostly blame the U.S. Congress, and not President Donald Trump or party leaders, for failing to pass their party's healthcare overhaul, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Wednesday.

The March 25-28 poll asked who should take responsibility for the failure of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), which Republican leaders pulled from consideration last week without a vote.

Besides Trump, who backed the bill, and House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan, who was expected to shepherd it through Congress, the poll asked if people blamed House Republicans, House Democrats or the media.

Republicans were most likely to blame Congress. Some 26 percent said House Democrats were most responsible and 23 percent blamed House Republicans. Another 13 percent blamed Trump and 10 percent blamed Ryan. Only 8 percent blamed the media. (Graphic: http://tmsnrt.rs/2nhOmjI PDF link: http://tmsnrt.rs/2nhtM30)

RELATED: Twitter laughs at AHCA not passing

20 PHOTOS
Twitter chuckles at Trumpcare's failure to launch
See Gallery
Twitter chuckles at Trumpcare's failure to launch
unsurprisingly, the Trump administration is forcing the GOP to carry this unwanted vote to term
President Trump just called me. Still on phone. "We just pulled it," he tells me.
“You can’t con people, at least not for long. If you don’t deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.” - The Art of The Deal
The Art of the Deal 1. Don’t learn abt the deal 2. Take someone else’s deal 3. Let 3rd party offer worse deal 4. Beg 5. Give up on the deal
I guess if you don't believe in contraceptives, you go for the pull out method. https://t.co/xUWpCQ2GYL
Source says "You can't always get what you want" is playing in the House conference meeting
https://t.co/MeeRHriEa0
Trumpcare is very popular. https://t.co/w3xFS3VDEF
Paul Ryan pitching TrumpCare today like https://t.co/bG0NGrEpgl
https://t.co/VS9daWXvzV
Key word "living." https://t.co/cE2Wo17dDq
I'm just a bill, 🎵 Yes, I'm only a bill🎵 and I'm sittin' here on- OH MY GODnoOO0MAKE IT STOP!!!!! https://t.co/bHIwD2LZYx
When it comes to the last 24 hours of #TrumpTruck and #TrumpCare, this is really all I can say... https://t.co/8enuOVdYTV
.@GOP https://t.co/kJbke16KqT
ooof the kicker on this New York Times story... https://t.co/YO6Wq3k5vK
imagine being angrier about the crowd size at your inauguration than legislation that affects millions of americans… https://t.co/zQatwphDZm
In Paul Ryan's defense, who could get a group this diverse to agree on anything? https://t.co/S1iua7IWpo
"Make empty threats. Ignore everyone. Hire incompetent people to do important jobs. Blow it all off and go golfing." - The Art of the Deal
Hey Republicans, don't worry, that burn is covered under the Affordable Care Act
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Their assessment appeared to align with Trump's criticism of Democratic leaders and the conservative Freedom Caucus, whom he blamed for the bill's failure.

Overall, nearly one in four Americans, including Democrats and independents, blamed Trump. Ryan, Congress and the media received less criticism.

The Republican reform was widely criticized after estimates by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office showed 24 million people could lose their health insurance over the next 10 years.

Trump said on Tuesday he still thinks healthcare reform can happen "very quickly" in Washington, but he did not offer any specifics on how it could get done, or what would be changed from the previous bill.

Nearly half of all Americans said they would like to see that happen, though the response was split along party lines. Some 80 percent of Republicans said they would like to see their party take another swing at a bill, compared with only 25 percent of Democrats.

In a separate poll conducted between Jan.7-23, 46 percent of Americans wanted to keep Obamacare, the popular name for President Barack Obama's healthcare reform, while fixing "problem areas," and another 8 percent wanted to keep it exactly as it is.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English in all 50 states. The March 25-28 poll included 1,332 people, including 456 Republicans and 558 Democrats. It has a credibility interval, a measure of accuracy, of 3 percentage points for the entire group and 5 percentage points for Democrats and Republicans.

(Reporting by Chris Kahn, editing by Ross Colvin)

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

Don't Get Too Close To a Newborn Giraffe Unless You Want to Get Kicked in the Nuts Don't Get Too Close To a Newborn Giraffe Unless You Want to Get Kicked in the Nuts
Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going
Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport