Energy Department employees reportedly barred from saying 'climate change'

So far, President Trump hasn't exactly prioritized tackling climate change. He's appointed climate change doubters to key Cabinet positions and rolled back several of his predecessor's environmental regulations.

So a Politico report caused a bit of a stir when it claimed an official in the Energy Department asked his staff to stop using phrases relating to climate change.

Specifically, Politico says a supervisor at the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy told his staff not to use the phrases "climate change," "emissions reduction" or "Paris Agreement" in their written memos. The office previously facilitated the U.S.' role in several big international efforts to advance clean energy.

SEE MORE: The US Will Battle Climate Change Without Washington's Help

Department officials deny outright banning of the phrase "climate change." But Politico notes an informal practice of avoiding the words has taken root.

The outlet went on to say Energy Secretary Rick Perry and his staff have a "visceral reaction" to mentions of climate change.

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Former Texas Governor Rick Perry is sworn in before testifying at a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on his nomination to be Energy secretary on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 19, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
President-elect Donald Trump's Energy Secretary nominee, former Texas Governor Rick Perry, arrives for the inauguration ceremonies swearing in Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States on the West front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
New Secretary of Energy Rick Perry embraces his wife Anita during during his swearing in ceremony at the Executive Office in Washington, U.S., March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
New Secretary of Energy Rick Perry is sworn in by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence (R) as his wife Anita holds a bible during a ceremony at the Executive Office in Washington, U.S., March 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump is surrounded by his cabinet, including Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney (L-R), Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Small Business Administration (SBA) Administrator Linda McMahon, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Ben Carson, Vice President Mike Pence, Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, as he signs an executive order entitled "Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch" in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 13, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump's Energy Secretary nominee Rick Perry (2nd R) and his wife Anita speak with Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis (R) before the Inaugural Parade in Washington January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Rick Perry listens to US Vice President Mike Pence speak as he waits to be sworn in as US Secretary of Energy during a swearing in ceremony in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building March 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) (L) and incoming US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry wait for a swearing in ceremony in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on March 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Rick Perry, former governor of Texas and U.S. secretary of energy nominee for President Donald Trump, left, speaks with Jared Kushner, senior White House adviser, center right, as Ivanka, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, center left, stands before the start of a joint session of Congress in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. Trump will press Congress to carry out his priorities for replacing Obamacare, jump-starting the economy and bolstering the nations defenses in an address eagerly awaited by lawmakers, investors and the public who want greater clarity on his policy agenda. Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 28: Energy Department Secretary nominee Rick Perry (L) and Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary nominee Ben Carson arrive to a joint session of the U.S. Congress with U.S. President Donald Trump on February 28, 2017 in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Trump's first address to Congress is expected to focus on national security, tax and regulatory reform, the economy, and healthcare. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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The department's role in dealing with climate change has brought it into conflict with Trump's team before. Department staffers protested after Trump's transition team asked for a list of employees who've worked on climate change initiatives.

Sierra Club Climate Policy Director Liz Perera responded to the report by saying, "Ignoring the climate crisis will not make it go away, will not create jobs in the booming clean energy economy and will not make our country great. ... The only place the climate is not changing is in the minds of those in the Trump administration."

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