Done the rock trick, now to hatch some eggs -- artist tries bizarre new feat

PARIS (Reuters) - French artist Abraham Poincheval, who famously spent two weeks inside a bear sculpture and a week inside a rock, began his latest feat on Wednesday - hatching eggs.

The 44-year-old, who specializes in performance art, will mimic a mother hen by incubating 10 eggs with his own body heat inside a glass vivarium until they hatch.

He reckons the endeavor will take from 21-26 days.

18 PHOTOS
French artist attempts to incubate eggs
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French artist attempts to incubate eggs

Artist Abraham Pointcheval sits on chicken eggs during his performance of 'Oeuf', during which he will experience gestation by replacing a hen until the eggs hatch at Palais De Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris, France.

(Photo by Thierry Orban/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval (C) sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval is seen in a vivarium on the first day of his performance in an attempt to incubate chicken eggs, which takes from 21 to 26 days, at the Palais de Tokyo Museum in Paris, France, March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval is seen in a vivarium on the first day of his performance in an attempt to incubate chicken eggs, which takes from 21 to 26 days, at the Palais de Tokyo Museum in Paris, France, March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

French artist Abraham Poincheval is seen in a vivarium on the first day of his performance in an attempt to incubate chicken eggs, which takes from 21 to 26 days, at the Palais de Tokyo Museum in Paris, France, March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

Artist Abraham Pointcheval sits on chicken eggs during his performance of 'Oeuf', during which he will experience gestation by replacing a hen until the eggs hatch at Palais De Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris, France.

(Photo by Thierry Orban/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval is seen in a vivarium on the first day of his performance in an attempt to incubate chicken eggs, which takes from 21 to 26 days, at the Palais de Tokyo Museum in Paris, France, March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch during a performance at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval sits on real chicken eggs until they hatch at the Palais de Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval is supposed to sit on eggs for 26 days. The artist made headlines worldwide when the two halves of the rock closed around him on February 22, 2017 at Paris's Palais de Tokyo art museum.

(STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Artist Abraham Pointcheval sits on chicken eggs during his performance of 'Oeuf', during which he will experience gestation by replacing a hen until the eggs hatch at Palais De Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris, France.

(Photo by Thierry Orban/Getty Images)

Artist Abraham Pointcheval sits on chicken eggs during his performance of 'Oeuf', during which he will experience gestation by replacing a hen until the eggs hatch at Palais De Tokyo on March 29, 2017 in Paris, France.

(Photo by Thierry Orban/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval is seen in a vivarium on the first day of his performance in an attempt to incubate chicken eggs, which takes from 21 to 26 days, at the Palais de Tokyo Museum in Paris, France, March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes)

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"I will, broadly speaking, become a chicken," Poincheval said last month.

Poincheval says he seeks to explore varying concepts of time for different species and natural objects in his performances. The best way to understand objects is not from a distance but by entering them, he says.

In his latest experiment, Poincheval sits on a chair with the eggs in a container fixed under the seat.

He calculates that the heat from his body - kept high by him being wrapped in a thick, insulating blanket designed by Korean artist Seglui Lee - will maintain the right temperature directly over the eggs. He will eat certain foods such as ginger to raise his body temperature.

He will be able to stand up and leave his place over the eggs for no more than 30 minutes a day to receive meals that will be brought to him.

For his own calls of nature he will use a box beneath him, though he will not be able to get up to relieve himself.

This is the first time in his explorations that Poincheval confronts the world of the living.

17 PHOTOS
Artist Abraham Poincheval and his artwork 'Stone'
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Artist Abraham Poincheval and his artwork 'Stone'

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses inside his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 22, 2017, before entering the rock as part of his project to live inside for a week. 

(REUTERS/Christian Hartmann)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses inside his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval (inside the stone) performs 'Pierre' (Stone), at the Palais de Tokyo on February 22, 2017 in Paris. A French artist was entombed on February 22, 2017 inside a 12-tonne boulder for a week, saying: 'I think I can take it.' With the world's press looking on, the two halves of the limestone rock were closed on Abraham Poincheval by workmen in a Paris modern art museum.

(JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses inside his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 22, 2017, before entering the rock as part of his project to live inside for a week.

(REUTERS/Christian Hartmann)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval stands in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 22, 2017, before entering the rock as part of his project to live inside for a week. 

(REUTERS/Christian Hartmann)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses inside his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

This picture taken with a fisheye lens shows French artist Abraham Poincheval performing 'Pierre' (Stone), at the Palais de Tokyo on February 22, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval will perform 'Pierre' (Stone), during which he will live inside a rock, from February 22 to March 1, 2017 and 'Oeuf' (Egg), during which he will sit on eggs until they hatch, from March 29, 2017 at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.

(JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval performs 'Pierre' (Stone), at the Palais de Tokyo on February 22, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval will perform 'Pierre' (Stone), during which he will live inside a rock, from February 22 to March 1, 2017 and 'Oeuf' (Egg), during which he will sit on eggs until they hatch, from March 29, 2017 at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. 

(JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval performs 'Pierre' (Stone), at the Palais de Tokyo on February 22, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval will perform 'Pierre' (Stone), during which he will live inside a rock, from February 22 to March 1, 2017 and 'Oeuf' (Egg), during which he will sit on eggs until they hatch, from March 29, 2017 at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.

(JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

French artist Abraham Poincheval performs 'Pierre' (Stone), at the Palais de Tokyo on February 22, 2017 in Paris. Poincheval will perform 'Pierre' (Stone), during which he will live inside a rock, from February 22 to March 1, 2017 and 'Oeuf' (Egg), during which he will sit on eggs until they hatch, from March 29, 2017 at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. 

(JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

French artist Abraham Poincheval poses in front of his artwork Pierre ("Stone") in Paris, France, February 2, 2017 as he presents his upcoming project, living inside a rock for a week from February 22.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

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Last month, he spent a week in a body-shaped slot carved out from a limestone rock in the same contemporary art museum in Paris, eating stewed fruit, soups and purees.

Before that, he had spent a fortnight living inside a hollowed-out bear sculpture in Paris's Museum of Hunting and Nature in April 2014, eating worms and beetles to mirror a bear's diet.

(Reporting by Nathalie Kantaris Diaz; Writing By Richard Balmforth; Editing by Gareth Jones)

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