Ann Romney volunteers to lobby against Trump's proposed NIH funding cuts

Ann Romney, wife of former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, has spoken out against President Trump's proposed funding cuts to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

She told Yahoo News, "I will be the first one down lobbying against this if someone will sign me up for that."

Ann is currently living with multiple sclerosis, an incurable but treatable disease that she was diagnosed with 20 years ago, notes PBS.

During the recent interview, Ann explained the process of breakthrough medical research which typically begins with philanthropic funding but eventually involves NIH grants before resulting in helpful drugs for humans.

She added, "Nothing comes from nothing. If you don't have that funding, there will be nothing. There will be no new treatments, there will be no new drug therapies...Progress in medicine will come to a halt."

According to NPR, Trump's budget proposal "includes a cut of $5.8 billion, about 20 percent of NIH's $30 billion budget."

The agency's current budget helps fund medical research conducted at more than 2,600 U.S. facilities, the bulk of which are universities.

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Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 29: (L to R) President-elect Donald Trump and Mitt Romney dine at Jean Georges restaurant, November 29, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump and his transition team are in the process of filling cabinet and other high level positions for the new administration. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
US President-elect Donald Trump (L) dines with Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges restaurant at Trump International Hotel and Tower, Tuesday, November 29, 2016 in New York. Romney, a favorite among establishment Republicans for being named Secretary of State, met with Trump for their second face-to-face meeting in 10 days. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) and his choice for White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) at Jean-Georges at the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump sits at a table for dinner with former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (R) at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney speaks after a dinner meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges inside of the Trump International Hotel & Tower in New York, U.S., November 29, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
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