Tetris may be the key to ending PTSD

Video games get a bit of a bad rap, especially from parents.

New research from Europe shows that at least one particular game can do some real good, Tetris.

Turns out it may actually help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder. That's according to a new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Scientists had recent car crash victims play Tetris while awaiting treatment in the hospital.+

In the week following, patients who played Tetris were found to have fewer flashbacks than those that didn't.

One of the professors who co-ran the study thinks because Tetris is visually demanding it may disrupt the process of harmful memories taking hold.

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PTSD and medical marijuana
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PTSD and medical marijuana
Army veteran Robert Tyler 68 of Colorado Springs speaks during a press conference before Kevin Grimsinger 42 and other vet's and supporters from Sensible Colorado submit a petition to add PTSD to the list of conditions approved for the use of medical marijuana to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Wednesday July 7th, 2010. Joe Amon, The Denver Post (Photo By Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - JULY 15: The Colorado Board of Health had a rule making hearing about people with PTSD qualifying for medical marijuana at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offices in Denver. Christopher Latona, center, and his dad Mike Latona, left, both testified in support of approving medical marijuana for PTSD which Christopher has suffered from since returning from his US. Army service in Afghanistan. They were photographed on Wednesday July 15, 2015. The board voted 6-2 not to approve the change. (Photo by Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images )
DENVER, CO - JULY 15: The Colorado Board of Health had a rule making hearing about people with PTSD qualifying for medical marijuana at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offices in Denver. After testifying Seth McBride, right embraces Greg Duran after they both had testified in support of approving medical marijuana for PTSD which McBride suffers from. They were photographed on Wednesday July 15, 2015. McBride is from Longmont and served in the U.S. Army in Iraq. The board voted 6-2 not to approve the change. (Photo by Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images )
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