White supremacist who stabbed Timothy Caughman to death regrets not killing 'a young thug'

In an exclusive interview with the New York Daily News on Sunday, James Harris Jackson, 28, said he wished he'd murdered "a young thug" or a "successful older black man" instead of 66-year-old Timothy Caughman, who Jackson allegedly stabbed to death with an 18-inch blade on March 20.

"I didn't know he was elderly," Jackson, who reportedly chose his victim at random, said. He added that he would have preferred killing "a young thug" or "a successful older black man with blonds ... people you see in Midtown. These younger guys that put white girls on the wrong path."

Jackson traveled by bus from his home in Baltimore to New York City on March 17 with the intention of killing black men in order to deter white women from having interracial relationships with them, according to reports.

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James Harris Jackson
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James Harris Jackson
James Harris Jackson is brought to Manhattan Central Booking on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. He is charged with stabbing a black stranger in Midtown. (Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
James Harris Jackson is brought to Manhattan Central Booking on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. He is charged with stabbing a black stranger in Midtown. (Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
James Harris Jackson, the 26-year-old man who is a suspect for the brutal stabbing in midtown, was walked out of the Midtown South Precinct located at 357 West 35th Street in Manhattan on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. (Photo by Anthony DelMundo/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
James Harris Jackson, the 26-year-old man who is a suspect for the brutal stabbing in midtown, was walked out of the Midtown South Precinct located at 357 West 35th Street in Manhattan on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. (Photo by Anthony DelMundo/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
New York Police Department detectives escort James Harris Jackson, an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan, from the Manhattan South Precinct on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 in Manhattan, N.Y. Jackson, a member of a documented hate group from Maryland, surrendered to cops just after midnight Tuesday. The 28-year-old man busted for fatally stabbing a black stranger in Midtown on Tuesday has told cops he came the city from Baltimore to kill African-Americans. (Photo by James Keivom James Keivom/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
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Police later said that Jackson intended March 20 to be "practice" for a larger attack against black men in Times Square, though the suspect turned himself in to the authorities voluntarily two days later.

Caughman, Jackson's black victim, was an avid autograph collector and former Neighborhood Youth Corps worker, where he helped low-income youth get job experience. Numerous media outlets — including the Daily News — came under fire after Caughman's death for reporting on his criminal record, which was in no way pertinent to why or how he was killed.

Jackson's violent hatred of black men and his fixation on black-white interracial relationships echoes a long history of domestic terrorism in the United States. White people lynched, shot and mutilated black people by the thousands between 1877 and 1950 — as well as for many years before and after. They often killed black men for perceived slights or advances toward white women.

"I have to do this because y'all are raping our women and taking over the world," Dylann Roof — a white supremacist who murdered nine black parishioners at a church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015 — reportedly told one of his victims before killing him.

Jackson was charged with second-degree murder as a hate crime, and is being held without bail.

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Charleston SC shooting suspect. Dylann Roof
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Charleston SC shooting suspect. Dylann Roof
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
This image has been provided by the Charleston Police Department, Thursday, June 18, 2015. A man opened fire during a prayer meeting inside a historic black church in downtown Charleston, S.C., Wednesday night, June 17, 2015, killing nine people, including the pastor in an assault that authorities are calling a hate crime. The shooter remained at large Thursday. (Photo via Charleston Police Department)
The Emanuel AME Church is viewed behind a police vehicle on June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A police officer holds up a tape in front of the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A view ofthe Emanuel AME Church is seen June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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