Trump expected to drop executive order slashing Obama-era climate regulations

President Trump is expected to sign a broad executive order Tuesday that will evaluate any rulings or actions on the books that "burden" domestic fuel companies, including coal, gas, oil and nuclear, Bloombergreports.

Those found to be a "burden" will be changed, suspended or eliminated unless mandated by law, deemed pro-business or considered to be in the "public interest" by the administration.

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Coastal Alaska reacts to climate change
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Coastal Alaska reacts to climate change
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: People walk down the elevated, raised wooden sidewalks - created so people don't sink into the melting permafrost - on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Joseph John Jr. collects fresh water for his family at the fresh water storage tank - one of the only places to get fresh water in town - on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Joseph John Jr. collects fresh water for his family at the fresh water storage tank - one of the only places to get fresh water in town - on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Boys play on storage tanks for fuel on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Samuel John, age 8, looks out his window across the tundra on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 04: Villagers watch children compete in foot races as a part of Fourth of July celebrations on July 4, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming temperatures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and coastline and erosion to the land. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A Yupik girl rides her bike late in the evening on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A puppy sits next to a walrus skull and a chain saw on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 29: The marshy landscape surrounding Newtok is seen from a plane on June 29, 2015 outside Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A Yupik family eats a meal of salmon that is half dried, then smoked and boiled on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A boy hangs out on the front steps of his great-grandmother's house on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Yupik children play on their tablets in a one room house on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Newtok homes are seen situation amongst ponds and tall grass on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Nathan Tom plays drums in his shed on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Erosion on the shores of the Ninglick River is seen on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Polo the dog waits as Rodrick Stewart (L) and Eddie Lopez set a fish net on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Yupik men head back to their village after a day of salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Polo the dog helps look for ducks hunting expedition on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Erosion on the shores of the Ninglick River is seen on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Eddie Lopez holds a freshly killed duck during a hunting expedition on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Rodrick Stewart (L) and Robert Page hunt for beaver on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Joseph John Jr. washes freshly caught salmon with his son, Jeremiah John, while waiting for the tide to come in on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: A Yupik man fishes with nets while waiting for the tide to come in after a day of salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: A Yupik child stands on raised, wooden sidewalks, used to help cross unstable ground, on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: John Usugan uses a rope to recover his snow mobile, which sank when he tried to cross a pond on it, on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: Yupik children play during summer vacation on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 29: The village of Newtok is seen from a plane on June 29, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
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The executive order will also do away with two Obama-era rules. The first ensures reviews measuring the environmental impact of an energy project will take climate change into account — Trump's been expected to do away with this rule for a few weeks.

The second rule Trump is expected to eliminate is called the "social cost of carbon," or the SC-CO2, which is a number that estimates the long-term damage that a ton of carbon does to the environment each year. The SC-CO2 has been a central to a number of new laws.

While any executive orders former President Barack Obama signed can easily be toppled, the Environmental Protection Agency won't be so easy to take on. States and environmental groups can use the courts to resist attempts by the president and congress to overturn its rule-making, and EPA staff have been prepping for a long fight against the Trump administration.

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Demonstrators set fire to Standing Rock camp
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Demonstrators set fire to Standing Rock camp
A building burns after it was set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
Chanse Zavalla, 26, from California, watches a building burn after it was set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
An opponent of the Dakota Access oil pipeline warms his hands beside a building set on fire by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
An opponent of the Dakota Access oil pipeline watches a building burn after it was set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
A building burns after it was set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
A building burns after it was set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
A building burns after being set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
Buildings burn after being set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Chanse Zavalla, 26, from California, walks past a building set alight by protesters preparing to evacuate the main opposition camp against the Dakota Access oil pipeline near Cannon Ball North Dakota, U.S., February 22, 2017. REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
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But Trump is already hawkish and effective in his anti-environmental executive actions. In January, he signed an executive order speeding along construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, leading to a swift evacuation and destruction of the Standing Rock resistance camps.

In Februrary, as Trump signed the executive order revoking clean water protections,he insisted that his efforts would create "millions" of jobs. Meanwhile, the solar energy industry has been booming, growing to 260,000 American jobs in 2016. That's a yearly jobs gain of almost 25%.

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