NFL owners approve Raiders' move to Las Vegas from Oakland

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - National Football League team owners gave the green light to theRaiders moving to Las Vegas from Oakland, paving the way for the building of a new, $1.9 billion stadium in Sin City, the NFL said on Monday.

The plan by Raiders owner Mark Davis, who has been a driving force behind the relocation, won the support of 31 of the league's 32 owners, with only the Miami Dolphins ownership dissenting.

The Raiders will play the 2017, 2018 and possibly 2019 seasons in Oakland before relocating to Las Vegas in 2020, Davis said during a news conference after the vote.

He acknowledged some fans in Oakland will be disappointed, but said his goal in the meantime was to "bring a championship to Oakland."

Related: See how fans feel about the move:

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Oakland Raiders fans oppose the move to Las Vegas
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Oakland Raiders fans oppose the move to Las Vegas
Football: View of Oakland Raiders fans with signs reading LAS VEGAS: IF YOU BUILD IT, WE WON'T COME and STAY IN OAKLAND during game vs Denver Broncos at Oakland Coliseum. Raider Nation, Black Hole. View of fans holding sign reading STAY IN OAKLAND. Oakland, CA 11/6/2016 CREDIT: John W. McDonough (Photo by John W. McDonough /Sports Illustrated/Getty Images) (Set Number: SI607 TK1 )
OAKLAND, CA - NOVEMBER 06: Oakland Raiders fans display signs asking NFL owners to vote against moving the team to Las Vegas during their game against the Denver Broncos at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on November 6, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - APRIL 28: (L-R) Oakland Raiders fans Tony Curiel, Eric Carrillo, Richard Cervera, and John Baietti, all of Nevada, wait for Raiders owner Mark Davis to arrive at a Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee meeting at UNLV with Raiders owner Mark Davis (not pictured) on April 28, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Davis told the committee he is willing to spend USD 500 million as part of a deal to move the team to Las Vegas if a proposed USD 1.3 billion, 65,000-seat domed stadium is built by casino magnate Sheldon Adelson's Las Vegas Sands Corp. and real estate agency Majestic Realty, possibly on a vacant 42-acre lot a few blocks east of the Las Vegas Strip recently purchased by UNLV. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - NOVEMBER 27: Oakland Raiders fans stand behind a sign referencing a potential move by the team to Las Vegas during their NFL game against the Carolina Panthers on November 27, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
Football: View of Oakland Raiders fans with signs reading LAS VEGAS: IF YOU BUILD IT, WE WON'T COME and STAY IN OAKLAND outside stadium before game vs Denver Broncos at Oakland Coliseum. Raider Nation, Black Hole. View of fans holding sign reading STAY IN OAKLAND. Oakland, CA 11/6/2016 CREDIT: John W. McDonough (Photo by John W. McDonough /Sports Illustrated/Getty Images) (Set Number: SI607 TK1 )
OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 18: A fan holds a sign in the stands in reference to a potential move by the Oakland Raiders to Las Vegas during the NFL game between the Oakland Raiders and the Atlanta Falcons at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum on September 18, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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The relocation plan appeared to be all but dead after casino mogul Sheldon Adelson and later Goldman Sachs changed their minds about helping to finance the stadium construction earlier this year.

Adelson had pledged up to $650 million toward construction of the domed stadium but pulled his support in January after the team presented a lease proposal without his knowledge.

But the Raiders secured financing from Bank of America Corp.

An additional $750 million will come from public funds via a visitor's tax on hotel rooms.

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