Nunes apologizes to House Intel Committee for meeting with Trump, public statement

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes has reportedly apologized to committee members, one day after he went to the president and press, saying the Trump transition team may have been surveilled during former President Barack Obama's administration.

According to CNN, Rep. Jackie Speier says Chairman Nunes apologized after their Thursday morning meeting, promising without a shared timeline to loop committee members in on the information to which he is privy.

"Details about the U.S. persons involved in the incoming administration with little or no apparent foreign intelligence value were widely disseminated in intelligence community reports," Nunes told reporters on Wednesday after his 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. meeting with President Trump. "I want to be clear – none of this surveillance was related to Russia or the investigation of Russian activities or of the Trump team."

Nunes sat on the Trump transition team's executive committee, and his going directly to the White House with information that has yet to be disclosed to the committee was criticized by many on Wednesday, including Republican leaders.

Sen. John McCain spoke out on Nunes' actions, calling the chairman's proceedings, "very disturbing."

"It's a bizarre situation," the McCain said. "I think that this back and forth and what the American people have found so far is that no longer does Congress have the credibility to handle this alone."

After Nunes' public statement took Capitol Hill by surprise, House Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi questioned the chairman's respect for the committee and called for an "outside non-partisan commission."

"I think he has demonstrated that there is some question about his respect for the committee," Pelosi said on Thursday. "I think he sent a signal that as a member of the Trump transition team himself, he probably should not be intricately involved in this investigation."

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